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Does an attorney have the right to 'confront' you about a bill you allegedly owe in a public place in front of random people?? Or is this a violation of some sort of privacy act??

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ChelseySpelsey

Asked by ChelseySpelsey at 4:20 PM on Jan. 26, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 4 (56 Credits)
Answers (12)
  • it prob isn't against the law but it sure shows lack of respect on their part
    Lyndall

    Answer by Lyndall at 4:22 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • I would think that is a violation of a privacy act. Just as bill collectors can not come to your work, etc.
    I would maybe contact your local Legal Board and ask.
    Best of luck!
    NewMommyin06

    Answer by NewMommyin06 at 4:22 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • Would this public place happen to be the court house? Because that's standard procedure. The privacy act means they can't call your mom or neighbor and tell them what you owe or attempt to collect your debt from them.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:22 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • "Just as bill collectors can not come to your work, etc."

    Actually, they can, and do. It's up to your employer to order them off the premises, but until they do, they are free to contact you by phone or in person at your job.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:23 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • Ok, I'm talking public place like, Wal-Mart. And - the lawyer says "When are you going to pay me the money you owe me?" LOUDLY to you while you're in conversation with another person.
    ChelseySpelsey

    Answer by ChelseySpelsey at 4:28 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • Not trying to spam, wish we could edit. Read this: http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/credit/cre27.pdf

    That is the law that covers debt collection. Keep in mind, it only applies to 3rd party collectors, meaning an attorney or collection agent who is not employed by the lien holder. If the collection agent or attorney is employed directly by the lien holder, those rules do not apply to them.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:28 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • As long as he didn't reveal an amount due, it's legal.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:28 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • NotPanicking - really it's cool, I know you're not spamming. Thank you! I need all the help I can get.
    ChelseySpelsey

    Answer by ChelseySpelsey at 4:31 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • I would imagine it would be breech of contract if he stated anything specific with regards to your case. Then you might have something to take to the BAR. It never hurts to check. Look up the BAR for your state and email them asking them about grounds for a complaint. They would be able to help you.

    QuinnMae

    Answer by QuinnMae at 4:33 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

  • First, a lawyer is going to know what he can legally get away with. Second, unless he stated specific information that would be detrimental to you, such as your social security, any private information such as financial info, etc...it wouldn't violate what little is left of any privacy laws. It IS highly unprofessional, and if he is part of a law firm you may want to speak to a senior partner about this issue. Also, if the bill is not for him, for his services, and he is speaking on behalf of a separate client, then you're in murky territory and it may serve you well to speak to the Bar. Not the BAR, which is the bureau of automotive repair...
    jespeach

    Answer by jespeach at 4:44 PM on Jan. 26, 2009

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