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The "whys" of evolution vs. religion

From an article by that same title.

This Harvard professor says it's because of America's dysfunctional society that more people are willing to dismiss Darwin in favor of religious doctrine.

Interesting article.  I hope you read it so you can contribute to a discussion on the subject.

Answer Question
 
jsbenkert

Asked by jsbenkert at 10:38 PM on May. 14, 2012 in Religious Debate

Level 37 (89,140 Credits)
Answers (26)
  • The operative word here is "choose".


    I don't have to choose between my IQ and my faith.

    mustbeGRACE

    Answer by mustbeGRACE at 10:49 PM on May. 14, 2012

  • "with high levels of income inequality, drug use, infant mortality, and other negative measures, relative to other industrialized democracies."

    OP, do you know where I could find the data that supports the statement in the article?

    It isn't new news that the harder the life, the stronger the faith, so I don't necessarily doubt his conclusion, but would like to see the country by country comparisons, including some of the 3rd world countries that are truly dysfunctional.
    Mom2Just1Kiddo

    Answer by Mom2Just1Kiddo at 10:56 PM on May. 14, 2012

  • I don't have any conflicts between my faith and scientific proven facts. If anything, they complement each other beautifully.
    Anyone who thinks science and religion only contradit each other is ignorant about religion, science or both.
    So my belief doesn't come from some desperate need, it comes from my own observations and analysis of the works, which screams of a creator.
    But I guess anything that makes disbelief look smarter, nobler or purer is wonderf for some people. I wonder where their need of superiority comes from...?

    Sharon
    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 10:59 PM on May. 14, 2012

  • Well said, Sharon. I have no conflicts either. We all know religion is stronger in countries where the living is harder. I understand that. But, yes, he fails to account for the wealthy and educated who are still believers in a creator. :)

    I like being on of the people that the more superior can't dismiss so easily...
    Mom2Just1Kiddo

    Answer by Mom2Just1Kiddo at 11:07 PM on May. 14, 2012

  • "We all know religion is stronger in countries where the living is harder."

    I don't think anyone can argue that, but the question is, how does that prove it wrong or an invention of men for dealing with hardship? In other words, the proverbial "crutch" that Atheists use to demean it? Sure, my faith got me through tough times, it's because of it that I'm here now, and can endure hardships I could never go through when I didn't have it. How is that a bad thing? Is alcohol, depression, cynicism, or bitterness a better "crutch" to deal with hardships?

    Sharon
    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 11:14 PM on May. 14, 2012

  • Sharon, it doesn't prove it wrong at all. That is what I find so humorous in the whole thing. If it proved it to be a crutch, then the wealthy, educated believer would be unheard of.

    Actually, I think there are very good and biblical reasons why it s easier for those experiencing hardship to believe. To my mind, watching people with very difficult lives live those lives with strong and unbending faith strengthens my own faith. They know true wealth.
    Mom2Just1Kiddo

    Answer by Mom2Just1Kiddo at 11:20 PM on May. 14, 2012

  • "Sharon, it doesn't prove it wrong at all. That is what I find so humorous in the whole thing. If it proved it to be a crutch, then the wealthy, educated believer would be unheard of."

    Well, according to certain people, "educated believer" is an oxymoron, because if you're a believer you cannot possibly be educated, and viceversa....

    Sharon
    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 11:43 PM on May. 14, 2012

  • "Well, according to certain people, "educated believer" is an oxymoron, because if you're a believer you cannot possibly be educated, and viceversa...."

    But of course! If they acknowledge our existence, their entire "theory" collapses. Frightening, I would imagine, to consider that other highly educated people might see something you don't.
    Mom2Just1Kiddo

    Answer by Mom2Just1Kiddo at 12:18 AM on May. 15, 2012

  • I've never understood the need to claim religion has been invented because of hardship or as a need for a crutch during difficult times.

    What I have seen, over and over, is that great difficulties are the mother of scientific and mechanical inventions. Religion

    The facts of evolution aren't in dispute, and it continues today. What I see is a frantic effort by the scientific community to 'prove' that there is some link between life that wasn't human morphing into human life.

    My question to them is 'why?'. The evidence for evolution is all around, and they can trace the evolutionary paths of even extinct animals with ease. Only that of the human animal remains shrouded. Instead of asking themselves some hard questions, scientists fall back on calling those who believe in any higher power 'disfunctional' and 'delusional' ... and are annoyed by anyone who won't bow down to their "superiority".

    I bow to no man.
    Farmlady09

    Answer by Farmlady09 at 5:08 AM on May. 15, 2012

  • I do not agree with his presumption that religion is overly strong here (in relation to other countries and in opposition to evolution) due to drug use, wealth schisms, etc. In fact... part of the far-reaching power of religion here is the uber-wealthy churches and preachers - whole television channels dedicated to religion - and the control of the mass media by rich conservatives... It is not about the hardships. It in IMO more a statement about the lack of proper education due to standardized testing and cutting programs that help people develop critical thinking skills, an overall laziness that has permeated society regarding thinking for ourselves, etc. While it is true that many turn to religion in times of hardship, people in those situations tend to be more open about religious choice and expression than those in power and those who wish to be.
    figaro8895

    Answer by figaro8895 at 7:11 AM on May. 15, 2012

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