Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

4 Bumps

I like wine, but I'm not sure I'd want it this way.

I like the message, but I think it would be lost on most people.  It's too much work to connect all of the dots.  Maybe, though, if I had enough of the pops, I'd get it. . .

Artist wants Jesus Popsicles to stand as statement on fanaticism, violence

Artist Sebastian Errazuriz says he wants "Christian Popsicles" to spark dialogue about fanaticism and violence.

By Eliott C. McLaughlin, CNN

(CNN)-Sebastian Errazuriz has used art to take on an array of issues: New York's death rate, the Occupy movement, military suicide, children with disabilities, the brutal reign of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Now, the Brooklyn-based artist is taking aim at what he sees as religious extremism.

At a party this weekend celebrating New York Design Week, which begins today, the Chilean-born artist plans to hand out 100 "Christian Popsicles" made of "frozen holy wine transformed into the blood of Christ" and featuring a crucifix instead the tongue depressor that typically hosts the frozen treats, he said.

An image of Jesus Christ positioned traditionally on the cross is visible once the ice pop is consumed. As for the frozen wine, Errazuriz said, he concealed it in a cooler and took it into a church, where it was "inadvertently blessed by the priest while turning wine into the blood of Christ during the Eucharist."

Errazuriz will hand out the wine creations on Saturday at Gallery R'Pure in Manhattan's Flatiron District before the "Love It or Leave it" exhibit.

 According to Gallery R'Pure, 10 artists are taking part in the exhibit, which asks attendees "to revisit the objects and symbols that have forged the American landscape through the eyes of their creators."

"Each piece is a personal interpretation of some aspect of American life, be it celebratory, critical or simply observational. The exhibition intends to question what the American life is, whether real or perceived," according to a news release from the gallery.

Other installments include a briefcase used to address obesity in America, a white picket fence intended as a statement on the American Dream and a "MTA chair" representing the loss of New York's old wooden subway benches.

While many of the pieces are provocative, none is quite so controversial as Jesus on a Popsicle stick. No stranger to controversy, Errazuriz said his intention isn't to upset people.

"It's not that I purposely want to get in trouble. I just believe if you are not doing work that can make people stop, think and discuss, then it's better not to make any work at all," he said.

Once consumed, the Popsicle features Jesus positioned traditionally on the cross.

Raised in a Catholic household, Errazuriz is now a "practicing atheist," but he has many friends and family members who are religious, and he respects their beliefs. He has always been vexed by religion, however, particularly the practitioners who wish to force their beliefs on others.

"(I'm) more than happy to recommend that thinking for ourselves and questioning the realities we received from previous generations can be incredibly liberating," he said.

Today, he feels that America is growing more extreme in its dogma, which is "holding a growing influence over American politics." He is especially unnerved by demands that U.S. leaders "publicly profess their faith in their god and enforce laws that defend the ideology of the Bible over individual liberties," he said.

His frozen cocktails stand as a symbol, he said, an invitation to "drink the Kool-Aid" that he feels so many religious zealots are stirring up. He hopes the Popsicles will remind the gallery's visitors to take their religions - whatever they may be - a little less seriously.

The United States is "rightly worried" about the threat of Islamic fanaticism, but Errazuriz wants to remind people that extremism is never acceptable, regardless of religion.

"In the land of the free, it's everyone's responsibility to make sure no one will ever force their beliefs on to others," Errazuriz said.

He pointed to the Ku Klux Klan, which decades ago was "a functioning, dominant political force in American society which identified (itself) as a Christian organization, carrying out ‘God's work,' branding the flaming cross as (its) symbol," he said.

Errazuriz wants his "Christian Popsicles," which will be stained red by the wine after their consumption, to signify the relationship between fanaticism and historic religious violence.

He also has hopes that the sticks "will prove Christians can take a little humor and irony - always a healthy indicator that might be harder to find amongst religious fanatics of other religions."

    - Writer-producer

Answer Question
 
jsbenkert

Asked by jsbenkert at 7:38 PM on May. 18, 2012 in Religious Debate

Level 37 (89,220 Credits)
Answers (25)
  • Taking bets on how long it will be before anyone who ever spouted off about the reaction of some Muslims to the Mohammed comic strip will regale us with how offensive this is.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 7:40 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • That's cool I like it
    Hesmynavyman

    Answer by Hesmynavyman at 7:44 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • I'm pretty sure they're not kosher, so I'm gonna have to pass

    Sharon
    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 7:45 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • Which part did you like best, HMNM?  This part: "His frozen cocktails stand as a symbol, he said, an invitation to "drink the Kool-Aid" that he feels so many religious zealots are stirring up. He hopes the Popsicles will remind the gallery's visitors to take their religions - whatever they may be - a little less seriously" or this part: "Errazuriz wants his "Christian Popsicles," which will be stained red by the wine after their consumption, to signify the relationship between fanaticism and historic religious violence."?

    jsbenkert

    Comment by jsbenkert (original poster) at 7:56 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • That would be frickin annoying...I don't like popsicles that are too far down on the stick to begin with so having to eat around the arms of the cross would just further tick me off.

    Oh there was an underlying message?
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 8:11 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • First of all, the priest didn't intend to bless the wine that he smuggled in, so I would disagree that it was consecrated during the Eucharist. Second, I think he was out of line to bring the wine into the Mass, our sacred liturgy, then out of the other side of his mouth say that he respects "their" beliefs. He could have made his "art" (and I am using the term loosely) without taking that step.

    Don't be surprised if Christians state that his "statement" was offensive or distasteful, but you can be sure nobody will be rioting and killing people over this. That is the big difference between this and the reaction over the Mohammed cartoons.
    Iamgr8teful

    Answer by Iamgr8teful at 8:18 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • i think him taking a cooler of wine into mass is disrespectful, but how does one do that discretely enough that no one saw or asked about it?

    other than that i agree with his message and im glad that he is speaking out against fanaticism & not religion in general. its a very clever way of making ppl look at his message...i probably wont think about popsicles without thinking of his art.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 10:42 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • Uhhhh, he respects his family tha is catholic? But snuck wine into a church to get it "inadvertently" blessed? No. He does not respect them.

    But, the Popsicles....don't bother me either way. Would have been much better art if he hadn't revealed himself a hypocrite. He either respects his relatives or he is mocking them, he can't have it both ways.
    Mom2Just1Kiddo

    Answer by Mom2Just1Kiddo at 11:11 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • He either respects his relatives or he is mocking them, he can't have it both ways.


    Or. . . neither.  Maybe he wasn't trying to be disrespectful but was looking for a creative way to share his message.  He is an artist, after all.  They often think outside the box.  It doesn't have to be an "either/or" proposition.

    jsbenkert

    Comment by jsbenkert (original poster) at 11:18 PM on May. 18, 2012

  • He wasn't trying to be disresplectful? He was raised catholic, but you suggest he had no idea sneaking in wine to get blessed without speaking to the priest was disrespectful? I don't buy it. Yes, it was creative. Yes, he knew it was disrespectful.
    Mom2Just1Kiddo

    Answer by Mom2Just1Kiddo at 11:55 PM on May. 18, 2012

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.