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Helping encourage your left handed child?

DS is 2 and seems to strongly prefer his left hand as well as activities like eating seem to go a lot more smoothly for him when he uses his left. Neither I nor my husband are left handed and like a normal 2 year old he wants to be like Mom and Dad so he tries to do things with right hand with mixed results.

Is there a good way to try to help him try more things with his left hand instead of trying to copy people around him?

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lizziebreath

Asked by lizziebreath at 12:59 AM on Jul. 4, 2012 in General Parenting

Level 19 (6,758 Credits)
Answers (10)
  • Find a friend or family member who is left handed?

    They say that until about age three a child will waffle back and forth in regards to dominant hand. My daughter has been 96% left handed from the time she could hold something. It hasn't been a HUGE issue for us because I'm ambidextrous, but I can see the difficulties you face.

    The only other thing I can think of is to show him with your right hand and have him mirror you. And, also strongly encourage him to do what feels most comfortable for HIM.

    Good luck!
    Rosehawk

    Answer by Rosehawk at 1:17 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • DH has quite a few left handed family members. So try to get him to watch Grandma more in how she does things?
    lizziebreath

    Comment by lizziebreath (original poster) at 1:30 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • My son is left handed and tried when he was little to be right handed. I just encouraged him to use the hand he was most comfortable using.
    He's 25 now and completely a south paw, lol
    Interesting thing we discovered when he joined the military was he's Colorado blind. Very common in men who are left handed! I always wondered why he was horrible at colors! Red was green and vice versatile! Poor kid :)
    PMSMom10

    Answer by PMSMom10 at 1:47 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • That should say "color "
    PMSMom10

    Answer by PMSMom10 at 1:48 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • Damn auto correct, lol. Sorry!
    PMSMom10

    Answer by PMSMom10 at 1:49 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • Yeah, if neither one of you can function at all left handed, bring around gramma or another few loved family members that are lefty that would be willing to help out.

    Funny thing with my daughter: All of my family, and all but one in my husband's family are all right handed. Thinking back on it now I probably should have been a lefty, but was too desperate to please and fit in that I switched. Guess it really doesn't matter now, but I find it mildly interesting.
    Rosehawk

    Answer by Rosehawk at 1:51 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • I remember when I was a kid, teachers worked hard at forcing children to be right handed, as well as parents.
    Wonder how many more south paws we'd have if kids weren't forced, lol
    PMSMom10

    Answer by PMSMom10 at 1:55 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • I say just let him be. He'll figure it out eventually.

    Also remember that there is no need to go "left-handed" when an activity takes both hands (like eating for instance). Switching hands round is neither necessary and can cause difficulties/confusion later in life.

    My mother invented a whole new way of knitting for me because she thought that a left-hander "needed" to be different - sigh - and now I don't know how to teach my right-handed daughter how to knit ... ). If only she had taught me as if I were a right-hander ... after all, you use both hands...

    OTOH, for one handed activities ... like writing, for instance, try sitting across the table from him. He'll learn fromt he "mirror image"?
    I speak from life long experience as a left-hander.
    winterglow

    Answer by winterglow at 2:13 AM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • Youngest grandson is left handed. He didn't even notice it was different than the rest of us until he started kindergarten and they pointed it out to him.
    meooma

    Answer by meooma at 12:40 PM on Jul. 4, 2012

  • I suggest leaving him aone at this stage. Encourage him to use both hands in simple things like handing him a toy but allow him to find the hand that is easiest for any given task.
    Dardenella

    Answer by Dardenella at 10:27 PM on Jul. 4, 2012

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