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12 Bumps

Heathen word of the day

I'm going to guess people are a lot more familiar with Catholicism than Heathenry, so why not educate about every religion and not just one?

Today's word: oathbreaker

An oathbreaker is someone who swears allegiance to a family, deity, or other symbolic entity, and then violates the terms of that allegiance. Or, it's someone who pledges to do something, and then knowingly fails to do so.

Examples would be saying prayers or going through ceremonies to declare oneself a devotee of a religion, then repeatedly breaking the tenets of that religion, such as being hateful, spiteful, or catty after joining a faith which puts stress on loving one's fellow man. Or, pledging to make some sort of personal sacrifice or habit change, giving something up for a month, or ignoring something that bothers you, then turning around and continuing the habit in secret, or continuing to interact with whatever was supposed to be ignored.

In Heathenry, being an oathbreaker is the foulest thing a person can be. It surpasses murder and stealing. An oathbreaker is someone completely undeserving of respect or even common courtesy, and they, along with liars, are considered the only people who will not find peace in the afterlife. A murder or theft can be justified, while oathbreaking is a sign of a much deeper flaw within a person's very nature.

Breaking an oath is one of the most difficult crimes to recompense. There is no simple monetary value or act of kindness that will alleviate the chasm of mistrust it creates, not just with the people or thing to whom the oath was made, but to all the other people who witness the act.

Answer Question
 
NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 4:40 PM on Jul. 22, 2012 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 50 (417,580 Credits)
Answers (22)
  • Very interesting...
    NP, where would suggest starting on the study of your path?
    Sekirei

    Answer by Sekirei at 8:39 PM on Jul. 22, 2012

  • Could you give an example of a specific oath one would break and how someone of your faith may try to make amends for it? I do understand that it's complicated process, I am just trying to understand it better.

    The first thing I thought of when it came to "allegiance to a family" is parenthood and marriage. Those are oaths that people break all the time...breaking the "oath" of parenthood would be almost impossible to understand...but, marriage "oaths" can vary from couple to couple to a certain degree. How is marriage viewed in terms of oathbreaking?

    Thank you for any answers or directing me to where I can find them, NP!
    BubbaLuva

    Answer by BubbaLuva at 8:59 PM on Jul. 22, 2012

  • A murder or theft can be justified, while oathbreaking is a sign of a much deeper flaw within a person's very nature.
    **************************************************************************************************
    I found this part very interesting.
    Thank you so much for sharing about something I don't know much about!
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 9:14 PM on Jul. 22, 2012

  • NP, where would suggest starting on the study of your path?

    The Eddas

    Could you give an example of a specific oath one would break and how someone of your faith may try to make amends for it?

    Anything that can be promised can be broken. Say you promise to your neighbor to care for their property while they're away, when they get home all their plants and animals are dead. Up front you would have to replace the losses, then you would have to do things (do them, not promise them) to show contrition, and then, over time, if they choose, your debt might be considered repaid. Or not, it's out of your hands. And even if they do call it settled, that's only them. There is still no trust with everyone else in town, and they must each be won back over individually. Then you must appease the ancestors for tarnishing the family.

    What it comes down to basically is you're screwed, which is why you shouldn't do it.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 11:05 PM on Jul. 22, 2012

  • What are some ways you can appease your ancestors?
    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 3:44 PM on Jul. 23, 2012

  • What are some ways you can appease your ancestors?

    Systematically repair relations with everyone who was offended and do something to improve the family name that's been tarnished. The trick is you can't fake it. Kind of like people who brag about how much they tithe at church - that's not doing it for the right reason, so it doesn't count. There really isn't such a thing as forgiveness, which is something I've written about before. There is utgard and ingard. Ingard is your family and close friends, people you trust with your life. Utgard are people outside this circle, and while you're civil to them unless they've earned worse treatment, they aren't trusted and aren't accepted. When you break an oath, you become utgard to everyone.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 3:54 PM on Jul. 23, 2012

  • Thank you for the explanation. I learned something new today. I love when that happens.
    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 4:10 PM on Jul. 23, 2012

  • What if you pledge an oath to something and later on find out it was a lie or something very harmful?
    skinnyslokita

    Answer by skinnyslokita at 5:45 PM on Jul. 23, 2012

  • What if you pledge an oath to something and later on find out it was a lie or something very harmful?

    It's why you shouldn't make them lightly. It depends on what it is, too - if it's a lie, then it's likely the other person who is the oathbreaker - they are not upholding their side of things, meaning you cannot do yours.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 5:49 PM on Jul. 23, 2012

  • OMG! You're back!! We've missed you. I learned something new today and it wasn't about being catholic. Yay!!
    2autisticsmom

    Answer by 2autisticsmom at 7:41 PM on Jul. 23, 2012

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