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4 Bumps

Do you know the origin of the word marriage?

A word used interchangeably with matrimony and wedlock
It's origins are from the Latin mātrimōnium - mater meaning mother, and monium meaning to take action. So the source of the word is to make a mother. in other words procreative sexual activity

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adnilm

Asked by adnilm at 1:33 PM on Aug. 14, 2012 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 40 (118,809 Credits)
Answers (78)
  • Thanks for the info.
    meooma

    Answer by meooma at 1:40 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • "c.1300, "act of marrying, entry into wedlock;" also "state or condition of being husband and wife;" from O.Fr. mariage "marriage; dowry" (12c.), from V.L. *maritaticum (11c.), from L. maritatus, pp. of maritatre "to wed, marry, give in marriage" (see marry (v.)). The Vulgar Latin word also is the source of It. maritaggio, Sp. maridaje. Meaning "a union by marriage, a particular matrimonial union" is early 14c.; that of "wedding; the marriage ceremony; condition of being married" is from late 14c. Figurative use (non-theological) from early 15c."

    from Online Etymology Dictionary.

    "The institution of marriage pre-dates reliable recorded history and many cultures have legends concerning the origins of marriage."
    from Wikipedia.

    the origin of a word matters not when its definition has changed...do you know the origin of the word "cult"?
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 1:52 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • Of course the origin matters.
    Okmanders, you are so nasty lately? Is everything ok?
    adnilm

    Comment by adnilm (original poster) at 1:53 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • dang..i guess you can blame it on the draught. ^

    to answer your question, i'd never considered the origin. so, no. thanks for the info.
    dullscissors

    Answer by dullscissors at 2:02 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • Well if origins matter you would know that the word marriage did not come into existence until 1297, thus the Bible did not use it (any mention of it in the bible these days has been edited in). Marriages predate it's "Latin origin" and the latin word has it's roots in the proto indo european word maritus, which came from maritare, which referred to the young woman (mari) and the "weight of her worth" (tare) . It also (Latin) was not developed itself until betweent eh 6th and 9th centuries. So just becasue teh church bastardized the term does not mean they have claims on the origins.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 2:05 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • Wedlock- for the record means "Pledge giving" which is based on teh middle english language deriving it's roots in Western Germanic and further Ingvaeonic or Celtic origins.
    Just because they are synonymous does not mean their origins are the same.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 2:10 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • So in short "Marriage" has been around a hell of a lot longer than the Latin word for it, just because the meaning was monopolized by a church does not mean it's definition cannot change, and it has. The Church changed it for their purposes as has the meaning changed over time as well.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 2:15 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • sigh...my point was words change despite their "origins". the word cult's origins date back to the 13th century word meaning "to worship". yet today we use cult as a negative word to describe small fringe groups that put members lives in danger. i wasnt implying anything about anyone, but rather using another words origins to prove my point. you did put this in debate to debate it correct?

    but thanks for the insult.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 2:22 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • I found all of this interesting and thank you all for the info.
    Words and their usage do change. The only languages that do not are the dead languages. Origins of words IMO are fun and interesting and most often elightening.
    Dardenella

    Answer by Dardenella at 2:26 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

  • sigh...my point was words change despite their "origins". the word cult's origins date back to the 13th century word meaning "to worship". yet today we use cult as a negative word to describe small fringe groups that put members lives in danger. i wasnt implying anything about anyone, but rather using another words origins to prove my point. you did put this in debate to debate it correct?

    but thanks for the insult.
    >>
    And condescension too! Of course you implying something else.
    adnilm

    Comment by adnilm (original poster) at 2:28 PM on Aug. 14, 2012

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