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Let's take a more serious look at this concept

The "poop" aspect is a bit distracting in that other question, so I want to get to the issue I was bringing up in it:

Can a being be "all knowing" without experiencing things directly? For example - we can see a dog get a shot. We can watch a slew of medical monitoring devices hooked up to the dog while it gets a shot, and we can listen to the noises the dog makes while it gets the shot. But can we truly know what the dog feels when it's getting the shot?

If a deity has not experienced something, how can it know what it feels like? If it is all knowing, how can it know the feeling of learning something new? It already knows it all, there is no way it can experience new knowledge.

But then there's the paradox - if something is incapable of knowing something, it cannot be all knowing.

Answer Question
 
NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 7:57 PM on Oct. 3, 2012 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 50 (418,508 Credits)
Answers (17)
  • I dont see it as invalid. How can you define something you dont fully understand? Even science has to eventually rely on "theory" at times, and just say "this is as good as we've got to this point"... Philosophy has been doing that as well... this exact subject has been debated, discusssed, argued, etc for thousands of years to no conclusion
    Nimue930

    Answer by Nimue930 at 7:48 PM on Oct. 4, 2012

  • How can you define something you dont fully understand?

    I think that's the point - if you don't understand it, you're in no position to define it. If you can't prove something is all knowing, you shouldn't make the statement that it's all knowing, in the same way that if you can't prove a dog dreams about ice cream, you shouldn't insist a dog dreams about ice cream.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 8:52 PM on Oct. 4, 2012

  • If you cant prove something is all knowing, you shouldn't make the statement that it is all knowing

    It is true that I cannot prove it. It is true that when I make that statement, it is a statement of belief I have chosen to accept. I cannot prove God is all knowing, likewise no one can prove He is not. But our attempts to define things, all things, we do not fully understand is how we gain knowledge, right? I may never be able to fully comprehend the all knowing state of God... doesnt mean I cant try to wrap my mind around it as much as possible. I may also never be able to fully comprehend the full spectrum of charting your DNA to determine possible future drug addiction, but it's there, and I work with it every day.....
    Nimue930

    Answer by Nimue930 at 11:34 PM on Oct. 4, 2012

  • It is true that I cannot prove it. It is true that when I make that statement, it is a statement of belief I have chosen to accept.

    But belief is not the same as defining something. If you read Descartes or Aquinas, everything they say can be disputed, but it's based in reason and logical outcomes of whether or not things are true. Belief cannot be tested, therefore it cannot be offered as an argument.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 2:20 AM on Oct. 5, 2012

  • One has to prove his existence before claiming he can't be proven to be all knowing.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 7:15 AM on Oct. 5, 2012

  • One has to prove his existence before claiming he can't be proven to be all knowing.

    If "all knowing" is a condition of his existence, proving or disproving the possibility of it is one part of proving or not proving his existence. If the claim is there is a being which is purple, weighs 8000 lbs, and can fly, proving that any of those 3 conditions cannot exist, or that any of those 3 conditions cannot exist in tandem with one of the other two, is the same as proving the being does not exist.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 3:55 PM on Oct. 5, 2012

  • Ah... this is why I believe what I currently do. Because I cannot grasp the concept that a god is all-knowing without having experienced everything.

    My current beliefs state that the Creator created and became the Universe in order to experience every single thing. It was not enough for It to simply *know* everything, It had to become everything in the Universe in order to gain the experience in addition to the knowledge. Of course I cannot prove any of the things I just claimed, but then again I am not claiming that the Creator is currenly all-knowing, just that it was a being far greater than we are.
    anime_mom619

    Answer by anime_mom619 at 10:07 PM on Oct. 6, 2012

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