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Breastfeeding... how much is too much?

Is there a time limit to breastfeeding?  What is your personal cut-off age?  Is there ever a point to which you would cringe if you saw another mom still breastfeeding?  (Age I mean). 

Breastfeeding is a personal decision (we all understand that) but what are your personal feeling and/or possible qualms about it? 

Answer Question
 
amazinggrace83

Asked by amazinggrace83 at 1:52 PM on Dec. 4, 2012 in Parenting Debate

Level 31 (50,234 Credits)
Answers (29)
  • I would 'cringe' to see a mother breast feeding in public over about 18 months-2. Once they are verbal and negotiable, they are old enough to learn some breast feeding manners. Including being patient. In private? I can't imagine kids try to breast feed much older than 3-4... I guess after that it might get a little uncomfortable for me to imagine.
    But_Mommie

    Answer by But_Mommie at 4:44 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • If a child can come up to me (or its mother) and tell me it's thirsty, it's too old to be nursing.
    Rosehawk

    Answer by Rosehawk at 4:54 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • about the same time as you (should) get rid of the pacifiers...when it becomes more about comfort/habit than need. so 2-3 depending on the kid. im all for breastfeeding for nutritional value and if BFing hadnt made me want to hurt my kids i would have stuck with it, but when they are old enough to get their nutrients from food, the BFing no longer serves any purpose but habitual comfort. i also believe all the "benefits" to extended BFing speak more to the mother/child relationship than the actual breastmilk.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 5:01 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • but the fact that i think of breastfeeding as more painful, emotionally draining, and frustrating than child birth, may influence my opinion haha. seriously, id rather give birth 10 times than breastfeed for one 15 minute period.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 5:03 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • I would have to agree with the double digits! :) That would be awkward! But it would also be very unusual. Baby teeth are called milk teeth for a reason. It is much easier for a baby to latch on and nurse with the tiny teeth. When the adult teeth come in it is practically impossible to get a normal latch. And, as the child grows their jaw changes, making it difficult to latch properly. I noticed my daughter's latch changing as she approached three years, and she quit nursing before her third birthday.

    Breastmilk is made for infants and older children/toddlers. Studies have shown the milk becomes more concentrated with nutrients, antibodies, and all the other good stuff when you are nursing an older child. They don't nurse as often, in fact my 2 1/2 year old would go several weeks without asking to nurse. She always increased her nursing though, when sick. Breastmilk was the best thing for her!
    micheledo

    Answer by micheledo at 8:28 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • I'd say 15 months is long enough. Once the child stops looking like a baby and starts looking like a toddler.
    mompam

    Answer by mompam at 9:44 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • I didn't fully breastfeed any of my kids (issues when I tried with the first). But, since I had planned on bf'ing my oldest, I had thought about it and decided that I would try to start weening around 18 months or so. I couldn't imagine myself still bf'ing a child that could actually ask to nurse. It would just be to weird for me.

    As for other people, I cringe slightly when people talk about bf'ing their kids that are school age. Just seems wrong to me. I get that there are nutrients, but by that time they should be able to get those nutrients from other sources, since they can eat regular food. I think it becomes more a habit/comfort then anything. And, when that happens is when I think it should stop.
    -Ashley
    spiritguide_23

    Answer by spiritguide_23 at 10:42 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • I personally BF for a year, but to each her own. I do think that after 2 years it's more about the mother being unable to let go than about any real, significant benefit for the child, but again, to each her own
    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 10:54 PM on Dec. 4, 2012

  • When they head off to college, I should think... Seriously, as long as mum and babe are happy why should it bother anyone else?
    ObbyDobbie

    Answer by ObbyDobbie at 5:45 AM on Dec. 5, 2012

  • "when they are old enough to get their nutrients from food, the BFing no longer serves any purpose but habitual comfort. i also believe all the "benefits" to extended BFing speak more to the mother/child relationship than the actual breastmilk."

    Well, you can *believe* that all you like, but the simple FACT is that the nutritional composition of breastmilk changes as the child grows and actually becomes more nutrient dense to accommodate an older child.
    You are entitled to your own opinions, not your own facts.
    ObbyDobbie

    Answer by ObbyDobbie at 5:47 AM on Dec. 5, 2012

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