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2 Bumps

Do you think an alcoholic should be allowed to receive a new liver?

do you think it's ethical to take one away from someone who lived a better life,to give it to someone who drank themselves almost to death?

 
butterflyblue19

Asked by butterflyblue19 at 3:08 PM on Jan. 18, 2013 in Health

Level 50 (383,297 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (23)
  • NO! My mother is an alcoholic and in liver failure. She asked me to get tested to donate part of mine. I said NO. Well one I am positive blood type and she is negative even if we shared the same blood type I would never. She choose to drink and was told years ago to stop and she didnt listen. Let them die if they refuse to quit drinking.
    LostSoul88

    Answer by LostSoul88 at 3:24 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • I would say if they were sober and have been sober for awhile yes. If they are still drinking no. I don't think someone should be punished for bad choices in the past.

    ditto.
    maecntpntz219

    Answer by maecntpntz219 at 3:17 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • I would say if they were sober and have been sober for awhile yes. If they are still drinking no. I don't think someone should be punished for bad choices in the past.
    skinnyslokita

    Answer by skinnyslokita at 3:13 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • If they have stopped, I have no problem with it, if we get into abuse of the body, many diabetics type 2 caused thier illness as well. David Crosby (reformed) lived a very healthy life afte a liver transplant. I think that the best match is the way for any organ to be donated.
    jerseydiva

    Answer by jerseydiva at 3:18 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • Oh and on the alcoholic thing, if they are sober absolutely. My friend was a raging drunk or 20 p,us years he's been sober 15 and needs a new liver
    funlovinlady

    Answer by funlovinlady at 3:34 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • i dont really see it as any different than someone who needs a new heart because they've damaged their own. my dad had a quadruple bypass in 2004 because he's smoked his whole life and eats horribly. he hasn't changed any of his habits but im still glad he's alive.
    tnm786

    Answer by tnm786 at 3:58 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • No, My cousin was a drug addict. Was given a kidney.  She abused it. that refused to giver her another. She dies.

    louise2

    Answer by louise2 at 3:13 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • there are many steps to go through before you get on a list
    a person can not be a "practicing" drunk and get on a list

    past behavior should not be factor IF it matches (imo), if they are healthy enough to get one, and a bunch of other factors, they should be on list as any other

    if we pass people by for past actions, should we count any possible future actions? where do we stop on the judgement
    fiatpax

    Answer by fiatpax at 3:23 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • a recovering one maybe
    san78

    Answer by san78 at 3:26 PM on Jan. 18, 2013

  • If they're still drinking, or only recently stopped, no. If they've been alcohol-free for a long time, and have shown that they have changed their life, I don't see why not. Everyone deserves a second chance.

    I think it also depends on if the liver damage was caused by the alcohol. Let's say, for example, someone has some kind of liver problem that runs in their family. And maybe when they turned 21, they got drunk that first time and became an alcoholic for a year or two, but then they got it together and quit drinking. Do we punish them for being an alcoholic when liver problems run in their family? Granted, the drinking didn't help, I'm sure, but if liver problems run in the family, and they only drank for a year or two, to me, it would be more likely the damage is hereditary, rather than alcohol induced, and it wouldn't be fair to write them off like that.
    wendythewriter

    Answer by wendythewriter at 3:32 PM on Jan. 18, 2013