Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

What are the ways to get some experience in science field a few years after graduation?

i graduated few years back but did not get any experience through internships etc. it's extremaly hard to get into the field without experience.i have 2 boys 4&2 yo and i think i could devote some time to mycareer. what should i do? short time volunteering is crossing my mind. can anyone suggest anything else? thanks

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 8:50 PM on Jan. 24, 2013 in Money & Work

This question is closed.
Answers (30)
  • If you still want to work outside of academics and you are near a big city, look for incubators (often attached to large universities) that work with start-ups and small companies who are doing work related to your field. These tiny companies often can't afford to hire many folks and may take you on a short-term trial probono basis if your skills honestly fit, and this may lead to more. You just gotta prove to them what you can do! Approach it as "here is what I can do for you" not "how can you help me" - they have their own problems and aren't interested in helping you. However, be very careful of the reputation you develop. These communities are small (even in huge cities) and people talk.
    Sebbiemama

    Answer by Sebbiemama at 10:47 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • You can't get any practical experience volunteering with a degree in applied physics. I think you'll need to plan on going to graduate school. You mean you already have your MS? In that case, I'm perplexed that you gained absolutely no internships in graduate school. That's almost unheard of.
    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 9:07 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • The point is that you shouldn't have even been able to graduate without some sort of research done. Hell, even for my undergraduate honors degree I had to do a thesis.
    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 9:18 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • "Undergraduate degree in physics which is about as useful as a liberal arts degree."

    HEY!


    Oh hush you I've got a Liberal Arts Degree too
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 9:21 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • "Oh hush you I've got a Liberal Arts Degree too"

    I'll admit, mine is pretty worthless
    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 9:22 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • Eh my hope is it will transfer into a $.15 increase in starting wage when I get my dream job. Hey, every little bit helps right?
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 9:27 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • You'll have to go back to school and throw yourself into applied research. That's the only way I can think of.
    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 9:29 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • LOL I believe your sarcasm detector may be broken
    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 9:44 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • Actually my degree is in Arts and Sciences but it IS a transfer degree. I of course focused on the SCIENCES since I am going into Radiation Therapy and Nuclear Medicine. While that $.15 an hour increase starting out may not sound like a whole lot it does give me an edge over others in my field and in reality eqautes to over $6000 more in annual salary for a career that nets more than $60,000 for new employees.
    Of course this post wasn't about me, it was about you and your inability to find experience for your "Graduate in physics" and why you can't find a job (or provide a title for your thesis which every graduate degree program has as a requirement for graduation).
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 9:51 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

  • "won't happen."

    Then neither will your practical experience, unfortunately.
    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 10:16 PM on Jan. 24, 2013

close Cafemom Join now to connect to other members! Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN