Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

6 Bumps

How do you, as a believer in the God of Abraham, justify God's behavior?

There’s nothing, no matter how heinous, which can’t be excused by the ardent believer. Just cling on to the idea that God is unfathomable, and presto, genocide and killing of innocents become moral and justified, though you can’t explain how. ~trj

 
IhartU

Asked by IhartU at 7:32 AM on Feb. 15, 2013 in Religious Debate

Level 27 (31,412 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (62)
  • Lastly, as I said before, getting tangled up in a debate with people who have already made up their minds that there's no room for discussion is pointless.
    ************************************************
    same can be said for you.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 2:43 PM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • You do have children right? roflol


    The difference being, of course, that we have limited ways to mould our children's behavior.  Believers of the Abrahamic god believe that he created us exactly the way he wanted us - remember, he's the omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent, all-perfect being.  He therefore had the power to create creatures that, if not perfect, are at least better behaved.  He has the control, not us.  So, if he's angry with his creations, then he'd have to be angry with himself for making his creations how they are, rather than throwing tantrums and punishing his creations for being exactly the way he created them to be.

    jsbenkert

    Answer by jsbenkert at 4:59 PM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • "but God doesnt always explain the "why" like good parents do"

    Parents explain the "whys" according to their children's understanding, but sometimes they just have to obey because mom and dad know best because they don't yet have the capacity to understand.
    But I do have "why's", the Torah, Talmud, Guemara, and other religious texts are filled with "whys" even if sometimes we have to realize our capacity won't allow us to understand the full "why" yet.
    The fabrics, for example. I may not fully understand the exact consequences and just because so cannot see any PHYSICAL consequences, it doesn't mean there aren't SPIRITUAL ones. It's like mixing meat and dairy, their spiritual energies are incompatible, it causes a SPIRITUAL damage. I know as much, I yet don't have the capacity to fully understand what the exact damage is.
    Saying it "obviously" doesn't cause harm is just focusing on the here and now.

    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 6:12 PM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • It's like mixing meat and dairy, their spiritual energies are incompatible, it causes a SPIRITUAL damage. I know as much, I yet don't have the capacity to fully understand what the exact damage is.
    ***********************************************************************
    How can you know it causes spiritual damage, when you don't even know what exact damage is done?
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 6:20 PM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • His Word (Bible) speaks for itself....and all of these character traits and qualities are found in it. Simple restating what God has shared about Himself with us through His Word. This info is accessible to all.
    deedee3849

    Answer by deedee3849 at 9:22 AM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • I don't believe God does any of these terrible things. He isn't there to keep us from experiencing pain, he's there to help us through it. God doesn't cause people to sin.
    Ginger0104

    Answer by Ginger0104 at 9:28 AM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • Not to mention, a lot of the Bible is *narrative,* not literal history. Are we to blame God for something He said or did in a story? It is believed by scholars, for example, that the genocide of Canaan represents instead the people who eventually became the Jews breaking off of a dominant culture and forming their own counter-narrative, their own counter-culture and counter-identity. Just as the Exodus did not really happen, or the flood, so to is it believed by most scholars that this genocide is merely literary, not literal. We can't read the Bible as actual history, we have to understand the point of sacred writing, of the narrative, etc.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 9:29 AM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • God did not do this out of the blue,His people had warnings to act right or else. As a Christian I believe the Bible and at the same time know I don't have all the answers to questions I have. i do have faith.
    RobinChristine

    Answer by RobinChristine at 9:50 AM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • God's Holiness is the essence of His being.
    ****************************
    hardly.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 9:51 AM on Feb. 15, 2013

  • Once God was satisfied that every bit of his creation was destroyed, he allowed Noah and his crew to start anew, and repopulate the earth through incest. It could happen no other way. His creations continue to disappoint him, even though he knew that they would, being omniscient and all, so he decides that the best way to fix the problem is to impregnate a teenager with himself, through the Holy Spirit, which is also himself, so that he could be born in order offer himself in a bloody sacrifice as way of forgiving the sins of the creations he created knowing that it would come to this.  Then, all of the sudden, he stops all communication, and leaves it up to clerks to write, re-write, translate, interpret and misinterpret his inerrant word, even though he says in his book that he wrote that none of it should be altered.

    jsbenkert

    Answer by jsbenkert at 9:51 AM on Feb. 15, 2013

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN