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What do you say?

How often do you buy your teens name-brand shoes, backpacks, clothing, etc? Do you just let them purchase it with their allowance? My teen is in sports with a lot of rich girls that have mostly if not all name brand items. How do you keep a balance? Do you think there is anything wrong with buying ALL name brand?  Even if you can afford it?! I mean the msg it sends to teens, rich & not so rich?

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 12:50 PM on Mar. 12, 2013 in Teens (13-17)

Answers (12)
  • Shop sales.
    funlovinlady

    Answer by funlovinlady at 12:55 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • Thrift stores have lots of Brand Name clothes.
    ILovemyPaulie

    Answer by ILovemyPaulie at 12:57 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • We do a combo of sale/coupon shopping and DD saving allowance for some things.
    tessiedawg

    Answer by tessiedawg at 1:05 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • I don't really do brand name clothing. I've tried to teach my kids that the brand name clothing isn't necessarily better than generic, and that material possessions aren't important - not that everyone who buys brand name is materialistic, of course. Plus, my boys grow so fast that name brand would be a waste of money for me. When they stop growing so fast, if they want name brand, they will have to come up with the difference between what I would spend on that particular item generically. If they can do that, then they can have the brand name. If not...well, it must not be all that important, then.
    wendythewriter

    Answer by wendythewriter at 1:28 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • I don't do name brand clothing; I never cared about it even as a teenager. It's hard when kids want to fit in with their friends and can't. I agree--shop the thrift stores. There are ton of bargains on brand name clothes, and many of them are nearly new. Hopefully, in time, most teens will learn that it's not the clothes that are important, it's the quality of the person wearing the clothes that matters. Hard lesson, though.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 1:37 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • My kids have never cared about name brand stuff with the exception of my son wanting DC shoes.
    My daughter actually loves finding stuff at thrift stores, and being kinda different.
    I never cared as a teen either- in fact I found a love for thrift stores in my teens as well...
    charlotsomtimes

    Answer by charlotsomtimes at 1:40 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • There are name brand clothes at Bealls or at Kohls if that's their thing. I think clothes should be bought when they are needed, not when they want them. Shoes are bought at the beginning of the school year and they should last all year. Backpacks should be a one time buy. If they want a name brand, like Jansport or something it should be at a reasonable price. I agree with tthe thrift store shopping idea.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:44 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • My DD (the only one who cares about clothing in general) doesn't care if she has name brand or not. She is very much her own person, even though her friends are the type to not only have name brand stuff, but more than one of the same item, like 2-3 pairs of Uggs. DD keeps doing her thing and realizes that she can get more cute stuff if she doesn't spend on name brands. I've also taught her to love the item, not the label.
    balagan_imma

    Answer by balagan_imma at 1:49 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • My kids don't care about things like that. Even if they did I tell them the law says I have to provide clothing, but not ridiculously priced name brand clothing. fortunately for me none of them care if it's brand name or target brand as long as it fits. DD does inherit some name brand from her cousin though.
    2autisticsmom

    Answer by 2autisticsmom at 1:50 PM on Mar. 12, 2013

  • What do I say or how do I respond when my child has wants I might not choose to or be able to provide?
    I try to take full responsibility for my part & make space for their feelings. Meaning, I try to own my decision (regarding whether or not I'm willing or able to provide those items) without implying that my child "should" feel or think a particular way, or that some wants are somehow wrong (selfish, disloyal, immature, unreasonable.)

    The more I recognize my choice & freedom in situations, & also that upset feelings, disappoint with a parent's decision, or wanting/wishing itself are not "problems" to be avoided, the less tense I feel about what other families might or might not be doing.
    I notice this where technology is concerned, too. Same principle! I can get really frustrated or annoyed at what others are buying or permitting if I have trouble tolerating "wanting," disappointment or anger in my kids. I think that's key.
    girlwithC

    Answer by girlwithC at 11:30 AM on Mar. 13, 2013

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