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5 Bumps

Doctors with religious objections- what care should they HAVE to provide?

 

If you have a religious objection to performing the duties of a job, then religious freedom means you don’t have to take that job. It doesn’t mean that you have the right to take that job, refuse to perform your duties, and then demand to be exempt from the consequences. If we allow people to refuse to do their jobs on religious grounds, where will it end? ~Adam Lee

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism/2013/03/what-care-should-doctors-have-to-provide/

 
IhartU

Asked by IhartU at 9:26 AM on Mar. 14, 2013 in Religious Debate

Level 27 (31,412 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (25)
  • In terms of jobs that provide service to the general public, whether it be doctors, police, firefighters. I think if you have a religious objection to performing your DUTIES than you should be relieved of your position. In these fields you cannot discriminate against treating or "serving" someone based on their religious, political, sexual, etc orientation. You cannot refuse service based on discrimination. Thus you should not be able to impose your own religious/political/etc orientation or refuse treatment based on it either.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 11:18 AM on Mar. 14, 2013

  • No it is not.
    A lawyer has the ability to represent anyone in his given area. Most specialize and will tell you, I do not handle custody cases or I do not handle divorces etc.


    A court appointed attorney can NOT opt out - they have to do whatever case the court gives them to do. That is more analogous to working in a hospital. If a doctor doesn't want to provide certain services, they need to specialize in dermatology or cardiology, and not be a GP. But, if they ARE a GP or a surgeon or an E/R doc, then no, they aren't entitled to endanger someone else's life over their morals.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 3:50 PM on Mar. 16, 2013

  • But if you are a vegan you do not have to butcher it or eat it.


    True.  And if you are a doctor or pharmacist, you can provide the necessary or requested care without accepting it for yourself.

    jsbenkert

    Answer by jsbenkert at 11:20 AM on Mar. 16, 2013

  • No it is not.
    A lawyer has the ability to represent anyone in his given area. Most specialize and will tell you, I do not handle custody cases or I do not handle divorces etc.

    This doctor does not do abortions.

    Same thing
    Dardenella

    Answer by Dardenella at 12:51 AM on Mar. 16, 2013

  • But if you are a vegan you do not have to butcher it or eat it.

    Split that hair any finer you could cut glass with it. You know it's the same damn thing.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 11:26 PM on Mar. 15, 2013

  • But if you are a vegan you do not have to butcher it or eat it.
    Dardenella

    Answer by Dardenella at 11:08 PM on Mar. 15, 2013

  • To hold him to a different standard then we hold ourselves is wrong.

    How is it a different standard? If you are a vegan and get a job at McDonald's, you're not allowed to refuse to serve everything but fries, drinks and salads.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 6:20 PM on Mar. 15, 2013

  • The doctor has the right to refer a patient to someone else or ask them to see some one else.

    The Dr. Has the right to take his or her oath of doing no harm. That may include refusing to do any elective surgery.
    Dardenella

    Answer by Dardenella at 5:38 PM on Mar. 15, 2013

  • A Dr is human the same as any of us with his own beliefs. To hold him to a different standard then we hold ourselves is wrong. If a Dr's beliefs are against abortion then why should he have to go against it. If you don't like it he's not holding you hostage and forcing you to keep the baby. He's simply saying he doesn't believe in killing a life. I do think that if a Dr has stong convictions of any kind that they could post a sign/tell you ahead of time so you are planning an abortion you could ask before even going in.
    baconbits

    Answer by baconbits at 10:34 AM on Mar. 15, 2013

  • if they have a problem with something it needs to be stated upfront and if its something that is part of their normal duties (like touching a female) then that needs to be mentioned when the appointment is being made. if the hospital has a specific policy then that needs to be stated up front as well.

    if the Drs' religion would prevent them from doing something that could save a life, then they should NOT be in that position. "doing no harm" should include doing harm by not doing anything.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 4:31 PM on Mar. 14, 2013