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Happy Autism Awareness Day: Had our first meeting with our son's autism teacher...

......and she asked what it was that made us have him evaluated in the first place. She said she does see a bit of inattentiveness in him sometimes but not much beyond that. I told her that his original teachers (the ones that first suggested he be evaluated) didn't really bring up concerns until he'd been in the class for almost 3 months so since it's only been a month in this new class we agreed to give it a few more weeks to see how it goes. So what am I supposed to do with this? We go through this entire evaluation and switching preschools for us to basically be told there might be nothing "wrong" with him? He has yet to be evaluated by an actual doctor - does anyone know if insurance usually covers that? As if I wasn't confused enough by this whole thing to begin with, I have no idea what to think now. 

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maecntpntz219

Asked by maecntpntz219 at 6:52 PM on Apr. 2, 2013 in Preschoolers (3-4)

Level 31 (51,304 Credits)
Answers (8)
  • Let me admit up front I don't know a whole lot about autism. But it seems to me that it's something that must be diagnosed by some kind of doctor, not a teacher at a preschool, no matter how well intentioned they might have been. I think, had something like that been suggested to me by a teacher, I might take what they said and explain it to the doctor, but I would only agree that my child had autism if a doctor said so.

    I think insurance should cover an eval - you can always call your insurance company and ask them. Good luck!
    wendythewriter

    Answer by wendythewriter at 7:11 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

  • Your insurance should cover an evaluation and I *always* recommend it. School evals a re a great place to start for some families but imho a private eval through a developmental ped or a psychologist is going to be more through and more helpful in the long run.

    Next I want to say that EVERY child autistic or not goes through a 'honeymoon period' when switching schools or classes. Some kids have a longer honeymoon than others. My son's was a good 4-5 months when we switched schools. His Autism teacher tells me this is perfectly normal. So, your son maybe going through a lengthy honeymoon. :0) Once is is completely comfortable he may start to act out or show a little more of what you may be seeing at home.

    That being said... what was the original concern?
    But_Mommie

    Answer by But_Mommie at 7:23 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

  • I would have the teachers write up a formal evaluation and talk to your pediatrician about it and he will refer you to a developmental ped who should be covered by your insurance. The developmental ped will make the official diagnosis if he is autistic.


    Question have you noticed anything different about him from other children his age?


    Evaluate your child using this test http://pediatrics.about.com/od/autism/l/bl_autism.htm it isn't a disgnosis but it will help you talk to your doctor about the things you notice about your child.

    amandajoy21

    Answer by amandajoy21 at 7:24 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

  • I was basically told "he needs extra attention", apparently more than the class could (or was willing) to give him. The examples they gave me were: he's often disinterested in group activities, he sometimes has a hard time sitting still at carpet time, he sometimes has a hard time keep him his hands to himself (they specifically stated that he was never malicious, just things like taking objects or toys that other kids were using without realizing it), he has random bursts of energy, and my personal favorite, the time he fell off a chair and "laughed hysterically" for a whole 20 seconds.

    The biggest thing I see that is "different" from most other kids his age is just his ability to sit still. He often can't wait in any kind of line for more than maybe 30 seconds before he's jumping all over the place, he has NEVER sat still to watch a movie or TV show (unless he's sick or very tired), and *cont*
    maecntpntz219

    Comment by maecntpntz219 (original poster) at 7:46 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

  • he has very little interest in doing anything outside of his peak interests.

    The teacher actually did specifically call it a "honeymoon" phase and since his original teachers had absolutely no concerns for the first couple of months I am interested to see what happens in this new class over the next couple of months/weeks. Unfortunately by then it will be so close to the end of the school year that it's making it hard to determine which route we should go for Kindergarten next year!

    Thank you for the link.
    maecntpntz219

    Comment by maecntpntz219 (original poster) at 7:49 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

  • "Your child does seem to have some of the signs and symptoms that should prompt and evaluation for autism or other communication disorder."

    ^^That was my result. However, most of the things I answered with "true" aren't things he does ALL the time and some of them (I think) are normal for his age.
    maecntpntz219

    Comment by maecntpntz219 (original poster) at 7:56 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

  • Many of his symptoms could also indicate ADHD inattentive and hyperactive type, but it would still be best to talk to his doctor and see what they think.
    amandajoy21

    Answer by amandajoy21 at 8:02 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

  • (My DS has Asperger's) Toddlerhood is a hard time for us as moms to be filling out those papers, especially when you are trying to answer about a child who is High functioning! I know I questioned every answer I gave and my son was 5! The thing is they don't have to do something all the time for it to be a concern. Lack of eye contact is the big thing you always hear about with Autism. My son actually has 'adequate' eye contact. He sill look people he knows in the eye pretty good. This always threw me! It was not until DS turned about 7 that I really started to no longer question his diagnosis- ever. The best thing you can do is get a specialist to help you decide. Reevaluate every year until you feel comfortable with whatever result you are given.
    But_Mommie

    Answer by But_Mommie at 8:04 PM on Apr. 2, 2013

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