Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

2 Bumps

Pentagon: Religious Proselytizing is Not Permitted


By Todd Starnes

Religious liberty groups have grave concerns after they learned the Pentagon is vetting its guide on religious tolerance with a group that compared Christian evangelism to “rape” and advocated that military personnel who proselytize should be court martialed.



The Military Religious Freedom Foundation is calling on the Air Force to enforce a regulation that they believe calls for the court martial of any service member caught proselytizing.

President Mikey Weinstein and others from his organization met privately with Pentagon officials on April 23. He said U.S. troops who proselytize are guilty of sedition and treason and should be punished – by the hundreds if necessary – to stave off what he called a “tidal wave of fundamentalists.”

“Someone needs to be punished for this,” Weinstein told Fox News. “Until the Air Force or Army or Navy or Marine Corps punishes a member of the military for unconstitutional religious proselytizing and oppression, we will never have the ability to stop this horrible, horrendous, dehumanizing behavior.”boykin

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, told Fox News he was stunned that the Pentagon would be taking counsel and advice from the Military Religious Freedom Foundation.

“Why would military leadership be meeting with one of the most rabid atheists in America to discuss religious freedom in the military,” Perkins said. “That’s like consulting with China on how to improve human rights.”



The FRC has launched a petition drive urging Defense Sec. Chuck Hagel to protect the religious freedom of troops “and not to proceed with the purge of religion within the ranks called for by anti-Christian activists.”

Pentagon officials met with Weinstein and his group were to discuss a policy called “Air Force Culture, Air Force Standards,” published on Aug. 7, 2012.

Section 2.11 requires “government neutrality regarding religion.”

“Leaders at all levels must balance constitutional protections for an individual’s free exercise of religion or other personal beliefs and the constitutional prohibition against governmental establishment of religion,” the regulation states.

Military leaders were admonished not to use their position to “promote their personal religious beliefs to their subordinates or to extend preferential treatment for any religion.”

Weinstein said it’s time for the Air Force to enforce the regulation – with zeal.

“If a member of the military is proselytizing in a manner that violates the law, well then of course they can be prosecuted,” he said. “We would love to see hundreds of prosecutions to stop this outrage of fundamentalist religious persecution.”

He compared the act of proselytizing to rape.
Thoughts?

 
Dardenella

Asked by Dardenella at 12:02 PM on May. 1, 2013 in Politics & Current Events

Level 47 (264,133 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (24)
  • I understand what your saying.   I'm all for stopping proselytizing in the military, but the words that are being used makes it feel like the Penegon is willing to misuse the laws in place.  Making statements like  " enforce regulation with zeal", and " we would love to see hundreds of prosecutions", just seems inappropriate. Enforce the laws, but this seems like someone willing to over reach the intent of the law, just to make a name for themselves. 

    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 10:48 AM on May. 2, 2013

  • These seems like a stepto remove any religion (personal beliefs or displays from the military

    How is not being allowed to proselytize taking away someone's religion? Millions of people manage to go through their lives every day with their faith intact and without trying to harass anyone into converting. That's like saying not allowing men to yell at their wives is taking away marriage.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 12:22 PM on May. 1, 2013

  • I'm not a fan of proselytizing but it can be difficult to completly regulate because it can be subjective and we still have freedom of religion.

    Also I really hate the over use of words that describe serious crimes, like rape. Proselytizing might be offensive and annoying but it's not rape.
    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 12:11 PM on May. 1, 2013

  • “Why would military leadership be meeting with one of the most rabid atheists in America to discuss religious freedom in the military,” Perkins said. “That’s like consulting with China on how to improve human rights.”


    And at that point, he has lost any sympathy or credibility. More like - the klan is pissed that the military is getting advice from a civil rights group. There absolutely have to be protections against proselytizing in the military. The way it is structured, any member is subject to abuse and extortion if their peers and superior officers are not following every rule to the t. That includes being bullied into professing a religion they don't believe in or denying their own beliefs to avoid discipline or abuse.

    There is no good old boys club more entrenched than this one, which makes it a dangerous place for anyone who doesn't fit the mold.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 12:14 PM on May. 1, 2013

  • It makes perfect sense to me that a military oficial shouldn't try to force his subordinates to accept his religon or extend preferential treatment to those who do, but comparing proselytizing to rape is way over the top, and offensive to me as a sexual abuse survivor. And the whole idea of a purge, with hundreds of prosecutions, reminds me of McCarthyism and the Communist scare. We all know how well that turnd out. Radicals, whether they are fundamentalists of any religion or atheists, tend to show skewed judgment in my opinion.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 12:15 PM on May. 1, 2013

  • As someone who has been in the military I have to say I agree with the move. Msny times soldiers are forced to attend religious ensembles etc. Which violates their personal freedoms. Often if they refused to attend they were written up on some bulkshit chsrge. This will prevent that from happening.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 12:26 PM on May. 1, 2013

  • So, if a soldier wants to talk about his/her faith, the military wants to make this illegal?

    No, but keep exaggerating, and you should have One Million Moms in your corner in no time.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 9:36 PM on May. 1, 2013

  • If I am an active duty military person, and I say thank God we made it out of the scrape, I could be court martialed.

    No that is a straw man argument and not even remotely accurate. Individuals will still be able to express their religious beliefs what they won't be able to do is have anymore "mandatory prayer circles" or Mandatory "fun" days at Christian concerts, or church picnic etc. where there is repeated offense and action of promoting a specific religious belief as has been rather "customary" despite being against regulations.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 1:49 AM on May. 2, 2013

  • In Basic Training some of us felt forced to attend church services on Sundays because if we didn't, we would be punished with cleaning the barracks instead. Why can't religious people just keep their god to themselves unless asked?
    IhartU

    Answer by IhartU at 11:47 AM on May. 2, 2013

  • but yes, comparing proselytizing to rape is moronic.

    A better analogy would be spousal abuse - someone who is in a position of power and abuses it by verbally harassing and emotionally intimidating someone into submission.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:36 PM on May. 1, 2013

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN