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Differential treatment and Education

"Nearly 40 percent of Native American students in Montana will drop out of high school. It’s a staggering statistic, one that educators don’t take lightly."

I am from Montan, it is amazing that the state is just now starting to recognize this and attempt to do something about it, which probably won't work as they never seem to address the real problem.

My thoughts:
Husband ran into a woman from a school official that was buying kids tablets to use for class(had gotten a grant). Mostly looking for ereaders. She said that she had bought kindle fire's for the "white" students but as she was buying for minority native students she needed something that could not get online as "they would get themselves in trouble". The problem doesn't just belong to students or families but the way the kids are treated in the school system. I would also like to see the comparision of the schools that teach the largest part of Native students compared to your average montana school, I bet you would see a staggering difference in resources and quality of education.

I grew up in a small town outside the city where I went to high school. I WAS treated differently by teachers. I came from a poor area that had a lot of crime. I remember being in the first few weeks of an advanced course my senior year and the teacher making a comment "Come on people this stuff is so easy a Clinton Kid could do it". He didn't know that I as one of those "clinton kids"(name of the town I grew up in). I had heard similar things during high School as well as witness the different treatment my classmates and I would get when we would go to another school during junior high for an event. It was something that definitely impacted my educational experience. Out of a group of 6 girls that I grew up with I'm the only one to Graduate high school. And the only one to ever set foot on a college campus(I got my BA).


Your thoughts? Have you ever experienced a group of children(not necessarily just a ethnic minority) that was being treated differently then the "general" student?


ps didn't know exactly where to categorize this.

 
tntmom1027

Asked by tntmom1027 at 11:46 PM on May. 7, 2013 in Parenting Debate

Level 27 (31,955 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (14)
  • How sad! Native students needed tablets that wouldn't go online to keep them out of trouble?

    I went to public school in the seventies, when the mainstreaming movement for kids with special needs was taking off. There are still problems with special ed, but believe me, it's come a very long way. As part of my socialization, the special needs teacher sat with me at a public lunch table, watched me take a bite of sandwich and chew three times, and then held my jaw closed and made me swallow, ready or not. It was so I would learn to eat at a normal speed like the other kids. Of course, they all wanted to know what was going on, which was humiliating. For some classes, the teacher put a desk off in a corner for me to use. That practice ended for good in high school when some of the other students protested against it. Routinely, teachers told me it was a waste of time and pecous resources to educate disabled students.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 12:00 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • That makes me sick. WTF is wrong with that school system?? I went to a small town school in Nebraska. My graduating class was like 42 people!! It sucked to say the least, especially considering my family and just moved there from Las Vegas NV. Talk about a culture shock! The kids there never gave me a chance, and the teachers thought since I was the "big city" I already knew too much and what could the teach me? I did already know the material at that time, but it was the school in NV was all year long. Then the fact got out that my dad, well step dad was a nuclear engineer so I was the "miss know it all". Never mind the fact he wasn't my bio-father! It was until junior high when the teachers came around, but the kids never did. I was bullied all the time.
    That teacher OP, needs a lesson of her own in treating all kids the same way. Not basing education on skin color and nationalities.
    Michigan-Mom74

    Answer by Michigan-Mom74 at 12:36 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • "As part of my socialization, the special needs teacher sat with me at a public lunch table, watched me take a bite of sandwich and chew three times, and then held my jaw closed and made me swallow, ready or not. It was so I would learn to eat at a normal speed like the other kids"Ballad
    Ummmm why?? Did you devour the meal like a starving waif who hasn't eaten in weeks?? She sounds like a first class bitch! :)
    Michigan-Mom74

    Answer by Michigan-Mom74 at 12:41 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • I have to wonder if that specific incident wasn't so much an issue with the system treating them differently but more that particular woman allowing her prejudices to affect her work. I may just be really naive (I've never been exposed to or seen such prominent discrimination firsthand), but that just seems like much too obvious a case of discrimination for a school district to turn a blind eye to.
    wendythewriter

    Answer by wendythewriter at 7:39 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • Sorry for bitching, but this is a big hot button with me. When I went to college the first time, a French exchange student said right to my face, "In France, we don't trouble with people like you. We have them stay home." I told her it was a good thing I lived in America, not in France. During my second college experience, I had a professor say to me, "Look, I'll tell you straight. I don't want you in my class. I think teaching handicapped students is a waste of my time. But legally, there's nothing I can do about it. Just be aware, you get no extra help, no special considerations." I didn't ask for any, but I was determined to get an A if it killed me, for my own pride's sake.

    I had Hispanic friends in school who were told they'd just end up pregnant and on welfare after graduation, if not before, so they shouldn't bother taking advanced classes. It's nothing less than a sin, no matter who's being underestimated.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 12:10 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • Tntmom, I hope there's a plan that addresses the problem from many angles. I don't know that much about Native American issues, so all I can do is look at it from my perspective as a blind person. I got two B.S. degrees and finally went to work for myself when I couldn't get hired because of ignorance and outright discrimination. But blind students have to work their butts off getting through school, all the while knowing that seventy percent of them won't find work when they're done, and well over half of the thirty percent that do land jobs will be grossly underemployed. The same goes for NativeAmericans, as far as I've read. Even if they excel in school, they have great difficulty finding work on or near the reservations when they finish. Breaking away means leaving their families and communities, which is a hard choice to make. There's a lot of work to be done.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 12:23 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • Ummmm why?? Did you devour the meal like a starving waif who hasn't eaten in weeks??

    No, actualy I had a problem eating fast enough, so they said I chewed each bite too much. It later came to light that I had a small, weak esophagus because that's one of the last things to develop in premature babies, and I also had low saliva production. In school, though, I was just being stubborn and trying to get attention, so I was timed and then they'd take my lunch away whether I was done or not, and my mom started to do that at home as well. Another time, that same teacher made me sit on the floor with my nose in the corner because I bumped into a counter and scratched the corner of my eye, and I got in trouble because she said I should have known where the counter was by that time in the year. It was all about fitting in, being "normal." One size fits none education.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 12:51 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • Holy shit Ballad. The stuff you had to put up with, and still have a good attitude, well at least from what I can tell in this chat room anyway. Damn, and you didn't go to the rooftop with a fully automatic gun and pull the trigger!! lol
    Michigan-Mom74

    Answer by Michigan-Mom74 at 12:59 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • Nope, haven't killed anybody yet. I've mulled over the idea once or twice, I admit. *Smile.* Like I said, special ed has come a long way from the early days.

    What gets me is that in 20-fucking-13, we're even talking about some bitch who wants to buy two different sets of school materials, one for white students and one for Native American students. Did the Civil Rights movement in this country mean nothing? You know, MLK, the Little Rock Nine, Cesar Chavez, any of that ring a bell?
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 1:31 AM on May. 8, 2013

  • " She said that she had bought kindle fire's for the "white" students but as she was buying for minority native students she needed something that could not get online as "they would get themselves in trouble". "OP
    IMO...Someone should "whisper" to the school admin about racial discrimination and derogatory remarks. And that bitch suspended without pay until the investigation is done.
    Michigan-Mom74

    Answer by Michigan-Mom74 at 2:25 AM on May. 8, 2013

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