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4 Bumps

Atheists to start 1-800 hotline for doubters

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Recovering from Religion, which has about 40 support groups in the U.S. and Britain, plans to launch a hotline that will offer doubters an anonymous place to ask difficult questions and find communities of like-minded nonbelievers.

The group plans to staff the help line 24 hours a day and is modeling it after services like suicide prevention hotlines.

Sarah Morehead, executive director of Recovering from Religion, told CNN that the mission is to help people, not convert them to atheism.

“A lot of the times they just need someone to talk to," Morehead said.

The group plans to staff the help line 24 hours a day and is modeling it after services like suicide prevention hotlines.

Sarah Morehead, executive director of Recovering from Religion, told CNN that the mission is to help people, not convert them to atheism.

“A lot of the times they just need someone to talk to," Morehead said.

 

Attempt at conversion, or a vehicle for which to get information and an informed opinion/a non judgmental place to vent? Discuss.

 
tnm786

Asked by tnm786 at 9:07 AM on Jun. 5, 2013 in Religious Debate

Level 43 (159,608 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (12)
  • Sometimes, a person outside their faith is exactly what someone needs to get through a "crisis of faith". There are quite a few people just on CM that I've had extensive conversations with - some ended up reaffirmed Christians, some looked elsewhere. Neither choice was because I told them to, but because they wanted someone to listen and help talk it out instead of telling them to pray on it or suggest it was something wrong with them (you're not trying hard enough, etc).

    To me, this just seems like an organized version of that.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 9:15 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • I think true Atheists don't give a crap about converting anyone, seeing as Atheism isn't an organized religion. But it IS nice to have other non believers to talk to, especially when you're surrounded by a very Christian family like me. Although I'm not sure I would call the hotline. Unless I was drinking... And CM was slow... And I'd totally record that shit.
    ABeaverhausen

    Answer by ABeaverhausen at 9:11 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • I can definitely see the point of it for those from a very strict religious upbringing who are now being shunned by their families.
    3libras

    Answer by 3libras at 9:13 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • Leaving something you've known your entire life- something you've been taught to believe is true is very hard. It's easy to slide back into those beliefs because it's safe and easy; it's like any addiction. I think having a hot line for support is an excellent idea.
    IhartU

    Answer by IhartU at 9:39 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • I can just imagine they'll be getting a few calls from religious zealots trying to convert those running the support line. Lol... glad to hear this is being set up. Sounds like it can be beneficial since leaving a religion is very often difficult with the pressures from family and within.
    anng.atlanta

    Answer by anng.atlanta at 10:03 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • sounds great to me. so long as they arent super aggressive it would be a wonderful opportunity for those who are doubting to get some real world advice along with the religious advice they are already getting. it would also really help those who have left a very inclusive, strict religion. they usually have no one outside their religious circle.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 3:24 PM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • You don't know how many people I have talked to lately that are just so sick and tired of the hatred being spread by religion. Many, many people are leaving churches... so, who knows it might just be a useful tool.

    m-avi

    Answer by m-avi at 11:56 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • ABeaberhausen is right. True Atheist don't give a shit about proving religious is a bunch of BS. But maybe this hotline will help people who feel alone about their non-beliefs and need someone to talk to about their frustration with people around them not understanding or criticism for not being part of the brain washing.
    LostSoul88

    Answer by LostSoul88 at 9:23 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • I do think that people who are having doubts often do not have a place to turn to get support, so in that respect this could be a good thing. But if someone starts pushing those doubts or trying to "convert" people I do think it wouldn't be so good. I do, believing the best of people usually, think that the hotline would fall more in line with the first, though, so unless I hear differently I think it's a good thing.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 9:49 AM on Jun. 5, 2013

  • I don't see a problem with it. Having someone to talk to about your concerns, someone who is knowledgeable and empathetic, is a good thing. Many churches have hotlines, so why not one for those who are having a crisis of doubt? Someone who needs a listening ear or advice about atheism isn't likely to call a church, after all. I'm glad people will have somewhere to turn.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 3:01 PM on Jun. 5, 2013