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5 Bumps

Let's nip the attempt at derailing in the bud and give it its own question: Why would (do) you belong to a religion you don't agree with?

Because whether you agree with it or not, identifying as a member automatically gives your assent to its policies and positions, as does the money you contribute and the time you volunteer in its name.

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NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 4:08 PM on Jun. 13, 2013 in Religious Debate

Level 51 (421,172 Credits)
Answers (38)
  • The ONLY reason I would stay in a denomination/religion I didn't agree with would be if I agreed with most of it enough to want to change the things I don't agree with.

    If that makes sense, lol
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 4:11 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • It does, if it's a viable option. In the example of the other section, women have no power, are not allowed to be clergy, and there is a very strict doctrine on maintaining "proper" gender roles. In other words, no woman is ever going to be given the chance to make changes to it, any more than a woman will be made a Catholic Cardinal and given a say on who gets to be the next Pope.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 4:13 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • "In the example of the other section, women have no power, are not allowed to be clergy, and there is a very strict doctrine on maintaining "proper" gender roles. In other words, no woman is ever going to be given the chance to make changes to it, any more than a woman will be made a Catholic Cardinal and given a say on who gets to be the next Pope."

    Oh, I get that. There is NO way I'd be in a denomination where I disagreed with something and knew there was *nothing* I could do about it. Honestly I don't think people take enough personal responsibility for their own faith. The because they were born into it excuse doesn't hold, IMO. We each SHOULD take the time to really decide for ourselves what we believe and where our allegiance is. We can't let others speak or choose for us - history shows us that over and over again. We DO have some level of personal responsibility.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 4:19 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • I wouldn't. That is why I am no longer catholic. I felt like a hypocrite when sitting in church and didn't want to continue to help fund a church I disagreed with so completely.

    I think a lot of times there is tremendous pressure from family and friends to stay even if they are not happy. I haven't attended mass in five years unless it was a special day in my family (first communion, baptism and such) and my family still hounds me about going to mass. Not going to happen. But they will probably never give up on trying to make me.
    SleepingBeautee

    Answer by SleepingBeautee at 4:20 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • I don't think people take enough personal responsibility for their own faith.

    And then you have to wonder, how many don't even know what the policies of their chosen faith are - they just go with the flow until suddenly there's a news headline saying their religion believes xyz, and it's the first they've heard of it.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 4:20 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • "And then you have to wonder, how many don't even know what the policies of their chosen faith are - they just go with the flow until suddenly there's a news headline saying their religion believes xyz, and it's the first they've heard of it."

    Yup.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 4:22 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • I think a lot of people just compromise. They may not agree with certain tenants of their religion, but agree with the big picture of what it stands for. Plenty of devout Catholics use birth control. I've known a lot of Protestants who drink alcohol even tho their particular denom deems it wrong. Premarital relations is another transgression that is very common across multiple denoms and faiths.

    When a person is pushed to the limit of that compromise, they leave. Where that threshold hits varies from person to person. There can be a lot of pressure to stay if they've been in that faith all their life.
    anng.atlanta

    Answer by anng.atlanta at 5:08 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • I don't and I wouldn't. that's the short answer since I'm not sure which question spawned this post.
    2autisticsmom

    Answer by 2autisticsmom at 5:46 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • I'm not sure which question spawned this post.

    The one about the Southern Baptist Convention demanding the Boy Scout execs resign. Some anon decided she didn't want to hear about it, so she tried to hijack it into how it's ok to belong to a church (Southern Baptist) and not like anything they do.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 5:48 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

  • Yes, my entire point was to derail your post about boy scouts. You caught me. That's was my sole intention. *eye roll*
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 5:50 PM on Jun. 13, 2013

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