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Hypocritical? BSA demanding apology from leaders for marching in Pride parade.

Boy Scouts of America is demanding an apology from two scout leaders who marched in the Utah Pride Parade earlier this month.

The council says the two leaders, Peter Brownstein and Neil Whitaker, violated the organization's policy which bans Scout members from using their standing for political reasons.

The two men marched along with some other scouts in uniform in the parade. The Great Salt Lake Council maintains wearing the scout uniform in the parade was a violation of policy. The council says scouting isn't supposed to be used to promote political agendas.

If Brownstein and Whitaker don't apologize, they could risk lose their memberships with the Boy Scouts.

But the two men appear to be unapologetic. They've refused to sign an apology letter and Brownstein essentially maintains they did nothing wrong. He told ABC News Radio he wasn't even in uniform at the parade and he didn't intend to provoke anybody.

The display came about a month after Boy Scouts of America lifted its ban on gay members. Its ban on gay scout leaders remains in place.

"I'm a straight scoutmaster with a wife, two children and a golden retriever," Brownstein said. "So it does not impact me other than the loss to our troop of some potential great volunteers."

The national organization is standing by the local council's decision to reprimand these leaders. A spokesman told ABC News the men do not represent themselves.

  

"It is unfortunately that these individuals chose to use a youth program to seek attention for themselves and to advance a personal agenda," read a statement to ABC.

"We received some comments back accusing us of promoting a gay agenda," he said. "I would say all we were doing was proudly displaying the colors at a community celebration."

Last year a bunch of boy scout groups greeted Mitt Romney at an airport but BSA have a no political policy. BSA admitted it was against BSA policy, but those leaders were not forced to apologize or had their leadership at risk.

Hypocritical? Or the whole two wrongs don't make a right? What are you issues with this? Who was in the wrong here?

 

Pride parade

Mitt Romney

 
LostSoul88

Asked by LostSoul88 at 1:13 PM on Jun. 17, 2013 in Religious Debate

Level 40 (119,476 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (7)
  • I think it's ironic that members can't support the gay community yet BSA can discriminate against that community and in essence support the "family values" bullshit.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 5:39 PM on Jun. 17, 2013

  • "The council says the two leaders, Peter Brownstein and Neil Whitaker, violated the organization's policy which bans Scout members from using their standing for political reasons."

    "Brownstein essentially maintains they did nothing wrong. He told ABC News Radio he wasn't even in uniform at the parade and he didn't intend to provoke anybody."

    We're they or we're they not in uniform? If they weren't in uniform, they weren't using their BSA standing to promote a political agenda, and if that's the case, they didn't violate policy. But you know and I know it's because it isn't the "right" political agenda; that's why they are making a big stink about it.
    mommy_jules

    Answer by mommy_jules at 10:53 AM on Jun. 18, 2013

  • Both. It's hypocritical to demand an apology in this case but not in the greeting of Romney at the airport. But policy is policy, I guess, and if one is a violation, so is the other.
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 1:29 PM on Jun. 17, 2013

  • I think part of it stems from they had been told ahead of time that it was against the rules but they did it anyhow.
    baconbits

    Answer by baconbits at 3:37 PM on Jun. 17, 2013

  • I think it is how you interpret. Going to see Mitt Ronmey could be seen as participating and learning about the politics of the land.
    Marching in a parade that promotes or protests anything controversial is strictly against stated policy .(the key words are in uniform which made the representatives of BSA). It is more strongly held for leaders than boys on an outing.

    Yes I think they have to admit that what they did was against policy and wrong. People have been asked for their resignation over these kinds of things. It just was not published across the country. This is a minor penance
    Dardenella

    Answer by Dardenella at 1:28 PM on Jun. 17, 2013

  • I will try to find the article I read that said they were in uniform. That would be the strong point of contention. If they were NOT in uniform BSA would be out of line ( unless they went on tv or a broadcast declaring their involvement in the event and in BSA before and or were carrying a sign or some other identifier (such as their uniform would be))
    Individuals can do anything they please if they are not connecting BSA with the event or action.
    Dardenella

    Answer by Dardenella at 12:12 AM on Jun. 19, 2013

  • I thought the photo in the article showed men in their BSA uniforms.
    baconbits

    Answer by baconbits at 9:22 AM on Jun. 19, 2013

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