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Why . . .

Why would a perfect deity's divinely inspired work not be perfect and transcendent?

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jsbenkert

Asked by jsbenkert at 12:04 PM on Jul. 11, 2013 in Religious Debate

Level 37 (89,331 Credits)
Answers (25)
  • Doesn't want puppets but gave everyone free will.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:07 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • I think you're answering a different question, anon.

    jsbenkert

    Comment by jsbenkert (original poster) at 12:10 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • One must believe they are of lesser value in order to bow down on bended knee to this so called deity.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 12:17 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • I thought it was because it said it was?
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 12:20 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • Are you talking about the holy texts? I don't think that "divinely inspired" means Divinely *dictated.* The texts are merely man's understanding, at their specific times and in their specific cultures, with their specific biases, etc, of Divinity, humanity, life, all that. It is *man's* collection of narrative, myth, and so forth. Understanding what types of literature make up the various passages of the texts help us to better understand the texts as a whole. The problem begins when people forget that these texts merely represent a starting point - various voices already within the conversation - and don't realize that we are allowed to add our voices as well, or that it is important to understand where those voices were coming from.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 12:26 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • So while I believe that the texts contain and reveal truth and transcendence, I don't believe they ARE truth in and of themselves, if that makes sense.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 12:27 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • It takes a great deal of cognitive dissonance to claim that the Bible or the Qu'ran, as two examples, are the word, inspired or actual, of a perfect deity.  In those books, all sorts of horrid acts are committed either by or by the command of the god of those books.  We recognize the brutality of genocide or rape, both of which are glorified and/or commanded by the gods of those books, yet people will still claim those books to be "perfect", or make excuses for the inclusion of such violence.  Some will stand by their claim of the books' perfection, and say that they addressed a people of a different era.  That, in itself, would deny the books' absoluteness - they are limited to a particular place and time, and clearly not meant as guides to our modern world, thus making those books quite the opposite of transcendent.

    jsbenkert

    Comment by jsbenkert (original poster) at 12:29 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • Band-maybe the truth is what each person gains from it. Simply because that is the truth they need in that moment. Just like any other written word-each person gets something different from it because of their own experiences in life up until that point.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 12:30 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • "n those books, all sorts of horrid acts are committed either by or by the command of the god of those books. We recognize the brutality of genocide or rape, both of which are glorified and/or commanded by the gods of those books, yet people will still claim those books to be "perfect", or make excuses for the inclusion of such violence."

    But not all of us claim they are perfect. Valuable, yes, perfect or infallible, no.
    We also have to take into account the time the various passages were written - in the time of tribal war, etc. Those things will be represented in the text. As well, a lot of the genocide in the Bible can be proven by science to not likely have happened and are believed by scholars to be representative of counter-narrative. There is nothing wrong with admitting that it is not an absolute text, applying the historical (etc) context, and reading it critically and objectively.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 12:33 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

  • And to clarify - I don't believe "inspired" means that God literally moved them to write or told them what to write or was involved in any way. I can be "inspired" by a flower or by an idea or concept, and that action is completely my own - the flower or thing isn't actually involved in the process, aside from my thoughts or opinions being about it.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 12:37 PM on Jul. 11, 2013

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