Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

2 Bumps

First grade and the grading system....

I had some ladies come over tonight to discuss soccer. They have kids older than my dd and their kids had the same teacher my dd does this yr for first grade.

This teacher will not give a grade above 95. She doesn't believe, no matter if they didn't miss one question on the test or paper, in giving perfect scores because nobody is perfect.

I'm a little flabbergasted. Makes sense why dd only missed one word yesterday and today and she got a 90. 90 is freaking awesome! Woohoo. We celebrated, but I'm wondering if any one else encountered a teacher with a similar grading system.

Answer Question
 
PandaGwen

Asked by PandaGwen at 9:02 PM on Aug. 30, 2013 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Level 24 (20,747 Credits)
Answers (13)
  • Not in first grade! Things like papers can be somewhat subjective, but on things like spelling tests there are a certain number of words, if you miss one that's easy to figure out what the grade should be. If my kid gets all their words right and doesn't get over a 95, I'd be at the school asking why.
    I had teachers like that in highschool that figured out ways to sway their final grades by adding in "class participation" grades so the teachers had some control and gave very few As but that's harsh in 1st grade.
    missanc

    Answer by missanc at 9:09 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • True true Missanc! I had teachers in hs that would sway it based on a variety of things! I totally forgot about that. It's been over 20 yrs since I was in school.

    95 is her highest. This year is going to be hell. It's a small school therefore only one teacher per elelementary class.
    PandaGwen

    Comment by PandaGwen (original poster) at 9:12 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • Between this and the info in your other question I'd say this teacher sound like an idiot... Not based in reality. A 100 is a 100. Even first graders can do that math.
    Crafty26

    Answer by Crafty26 at 9:14 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • I think this teacher has issues. How old is she?
    DJDNY

    Answer by DJDNY at 9:17 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • I think she is a bitch, personally. My SS said she was the principal when he was I school. He's been out 7 yrs now. He said she's always been a hard ass. she's very intimidating too. I'm 5 ft 2 and come up to her elbows, she had to be around 6 ft. 3.

    Long year. I have a feeling you guys willbe hearing a lot of me.
    PandaGwen

    Comment by PandaGwen (original poster) at 9:19 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • She's got to be in her early 50s. Maybe just maybe middle 50s.
    PandaGwen

    Comment by PandaGwen (original poster) at 9:20 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • This teacher will not give a grade above 95... because nobody is perfect.

    Well, we have established how I feel about the egos of children and this shit just wouldn't fly.
    This woman is going to teach your child, no matter how hard she tries, no matter what she does she will never excel.

    Has anyone been able to document her saying this?
    A recording? Something in writing?
    feralxat

    Answer by feralxat at 9:23 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • Sorry, but that's just fucked up. If a kid gets everything right on a test, that's worth a perfect score. I'd be spitting nails, and I'd also be taking any perfect papers with less than perfect scores in for the principal to see. Is there any way you can put your kiddo in another class?
    Ballad

    Answer by Ballad at 9:30 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • On a test or assignment with right & wrong answers, there IS a possible "perfect" outcome. Her logic doesn't even make sense. That isn't about "somebody" being perfect; it's about work being correct, or having no mistakes ("imperfections.")

    I haven't encountered anything remotely similar. There are no grades at my daughter's school. (They use descriptive review or descriptive inquiry, so they observe the kids closely in their work & keep notes that they compile each week, from which they write detailed narrative reports of what the child is doing as a learner. We get these at the end of each term, in lieu of a report card.) When they test their spelling, they indicate whether or not the words are spelled correctly. That's what the kids check when gauging their progress.

    Oh well, this situation gives you a good reason to downplay the actual grade/measure and focus on the product: her work, her effort, her progress.
    girlwithC

    Answer by girlwithC at 9:39 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

  • Feral, idk. This is what the group said. I plan to investigate and document.

    Ballad, no. Small school. Only one teacher per elem class. So small only 13 kids graduated last year.
    PandaGwen

    Comment by PandaGwen (original poster) at 9:42 PM on Aug. 30, 2013

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.
close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN