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Who is entitled to revenge?

The fallout over Castro's suicide has been interesting. A lot of people screaming that he took the coward's way out, deserved to be punished, etc etc. Some are sad that he didn't live long enough to be tortured by other inmates in prison or killed by them.

That's a lot of rage for people not directly involved. It makes sense for those harmed by him to want vengeance. There are a handful of people not directly involved - judge/jury/etc - who were forced into making a judgment by nothing more than luck of the draw, it could've gone to any judge's court in the district, any random jury.

There is a distinct bloodlust surrounding this man, and a profound sense of disappointment that he did not suffer more before he died. (and let's be real, if he didn't commit suicide, they'd still say he did, and nobody is going to look that hard to prove otherwise) Are people not directly involved entitled to this outrage? It seems directly counter to most philosophies, whether they are Christian, secular humanist, or something in between.

Answer Question
 
NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 8:11 AM on Sep. 4, 2013 in Religious Debate

Level 51 (421,172 Credits)
Answers (23)
  • Well having attended vigils and such for Gina & amanda, I'm glad that pos is gone. This case has hit so hard in Cleveland. They were kidnapped right down the street from my sons grandmothers house. Ill own it, I would have liked him to get his ass handed to him a few times. He is a coward, he kept those girls for ten years and tortured them he couldn't stand a few months. Good riddance I say.
    funlovinlady

    Answer by funlovinlady at 8:24 AM on Sep. 4, 2013



  • For some people who wish to have seen him suffer, they may have seen him as a stand in for their own assailant?
    feralxat

    Answer by feralxat at 8:26 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • i don't care- the monster is dead. in the end he got what he deserved, regardless of how it happened.
    tnm786

    Answer by tnm786 at 8:28 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • Revenge and punishment are two different things. I agree his suicide was the coward's way out - the years in prison would have been punishment for his crime, which he deserved - just like grounding a child for staying out late or taking the car away when they get a speeding ticket is punishment for what the child has done. I don't think being upset that he (in a sense) circumvented his punishment necessarily indicates a thirst for revenge, but an outrage that he won't have to "do the time" for his crime. There are some that are looking for revenge, I won't argue, and when it comes to those people, I say no one is entitled to revenge, except maybe his victims, and even for them - I think it would do THEM more harm than good to get revenge. But I don't think everyone who is unhappy he killed himself is looking for revenge - it's just seen as not right that he's managed to avoid the punishment he was given.
    wendythewriter

    Answer by wendythewriter at 8:50 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • I think it's so easy to fall into our desire for revenge and vengeance, especially when it is against someone who did something that can easily be imagined as happening to someone we love.
    Wanting him to be punished according to the law is one thing-wishing revenge upon him is another. It is a primal human response though IMO.
    If it were my family he harmed-I won't lie, it d take a lot for me not to envision all kinds of horrible acts being taken against him. Being removed from it-I'm just glad he was finally discovered and those girls are free. That's the most important thing-they are free. And he lost his power that day.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 8:51 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • he's managed to avoid the punishment he was given.

    He is dead. You can't get more punished than that. It's not like he jumped the fence and took a plane to Cancun.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 8:52 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • I understand what you're saying NP but the media draws us in and we get to see inside the lives of these 3 women and the child one bore.
    It's human nature to say, whether they're personally involved or not, good riddance!
    Yes, I think he took the chicken shit#t way out, I would have much preferred he wake up everyday fearful, like the girls, but...this was his way so I bid his ass farewell!


    KTElite

    Answer by KTElite at 9:36 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • He is dead. You can't get more punished than that. It's not like he jumped the fence and took a plane to Cancun.

    He's dead, yes. But is that really a punishment? He's not living with what he did. He's not having to look himself in the mirror, knowing what he did. There will never come a day when he'll realize, "OMG, I was a horrible person. I raped and abused and tormented three women who did nothing to deserve it."

    I get your point, in the sense that since he's dead, it's all over and done, he has no chance to hurt anyone else or make a better life for himself. But the idea that his death is an actual punishment for what he did - I'm not really sure I can agree there. I think it was simply a way to avoid facing reality.
    wendythewriter

    Answer by wendythewriter at 10:47 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • I think if I were his victim I'd be more comfortable with him being dad. There's no chance of him getting out and repeating that crime in any way, shape or form.
    Besides the fact that we don't know what happens after this life. We don't know if he is or isn't still being punished for this crime in some sense.
    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 10:59 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

  • I do believe he took the easy way out and found a way out of having to live with what he'd done. But I'm not one saying he needed to have suffered or anyone was entitled to revenge. Just that I feel he found a way around the justice system. Death wasn't a punishment, in this case. It was a release from punishment (although that opens the door for discussion on the point of prison and punishment versus reform, etc, etc). He took the lesser of two "evils," so to speak.
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 11:15 AM on Sep. 4, 2013

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