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2 Bumps

Neo-Nazi's and White Supremacists starting their own town in ND

Tiny North Dakota town braces against neo-Nazi plans for all-white community

1st off, it's disturbing how this is getting more coverage internationally than it is in the US

So what do they do - de-certify the town and leave the people who were there originally with nothing they've paid into for all these years, help relocate the existing residents, try to force the "new" residents out?

Answer Question
 
NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 9:49 AM on Sep. 22, 2013 in Politics & Current Events

Level 51 (421,172 Credits)
Answers (14)
  • How awful. In many other countries this would be borderline prosecution for conspiracy ... I can't see how any good could possibly come from this kind of community. All-white communities exist all over the world because they just happen in places where whites are a majority but when you purposely set up an all-white community it leads to think that there are other reasons...

    JMHO
    goldpandora

    Answer by goldpandora at 11:08 AM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • I don't know. I read about that this morning. I don't care if a bunch of bigots want to live in a community together, what bothered me about the article is that they are taking over an already existing town.
    QuinnMae

    Answer by QuinnMae at 11:13 AM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • I think it's sad that the existing residents have to deal with this. Why should they be forced to put up with it or leave? I hope they can find a way to get rid of the scum. How awful it would be to be forced to relocate.
    anime_mom619

    Answer by anime_mom619 at 11:34 AM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • I've been reading about this for weeks. I think I'm most disturbed that two of the leaders, April Gaede and Jeff Schoep, are so young. Born in '66 and '72, respectively. Cobb is 61 and Metzger is in his mid-70s, but with young people in the movement you can't hope it will just die off soon due to attrition. Unless more kids of white supremacists shoot their parents, like Jeff Hall in Riverside. His 10 year old shot him to death.

    Too bad we don't have some kind of island that we can just exile them to. They can practice their beliefs and not be disturbed by anyone who doesn't fit into their narrow worldview.
    gdiamante

    Answer by gdiamante at 11:36 AM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • According to the article Cobb is wanted in Canada for promoting hatred. One would wonder why we didn't send him right back there.

    The problem as I see it (beyond the obvious) is that this has all been done legally. WBC is much the same in that they are fully versed and educated with regard to the legality of their behavior and they make it a point to stay within the confines of the law. Nothing worse than a well read bigot.

    "but with young people in the movement you can't hope it will just die off soon due to attrition"

    This is a good supporting point. We've tended to overlook these groups because so many people assume that they're dying away. Nothing could be further from the truth and we ignore this trend at our peril. I think this speaks to why we see so much more in-depth coverage internationally than here. Europe has been dealing with white supremacy groups for a while now. They know the warning signs.

    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 1:04 PM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • they are fully versed and educated with regard to the legality of their behavior

    No kidding, Metzger has beat criminal charges before, even going so far as to worm out of a murder conspiracy (there have been movies and tv episodes of L&O modeled on that case).

    I'm not sure why people have the idea that it's an older or dying movement. All of these groups are thriving around the US, and they specifically recruit at high schools, colleges and military bases.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 1:09 PM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • "I'm not sure why people have the idea that it's an older or dying movement."

    Probably because we've always been a lazy society with regard to current events. I'd be willing to bet that if you asked 10 random people on the street to name the top three supremacy groups in the US the only one they'd come up with would be the KKK.

    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 1:39 PM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • ""I'm not sure why people have the idea that it's an older or dying movement."

    I'm not sure either. I covered a NSM rally in Riverside a few years ago (in fact, one of the last big events Jeff Hall did before his kid shot him and I interviewed Hall... scary guy)... most of the Neo-Nazis were in their 20s to 40s.

    Now there was one strange thing at that rally too. They were protesting illegal immigration, and they were joined by a little old Hispanic lady. She had to be in her 60s. She wouldn't give me her full name, but she told me that she agreed with them that people shouldn't be allowed to come into the country illegally. She said people should enter legally as she did. She didn't shout, she didn't carry a sign. She just stood next to these men and women who were shouting some really hateful things at the much larger crowd of counter-protesters.
    gdiamante

    Answer by gdiamante at 1:45 PM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • " and they were joined by a little old Hispanic lady. She had to be in her 60s"

    Wow. I wonder why she chose that particular group to associate herself with? What an interesting dynamic. Now I'm really curious lol
    Mrs_Prissy

    Answer by Mrs_Prissy at 2:08 PM on Sep. 22, 2013

  • If I'm not mistaken, this story was on 60 Minutes a week or two ago. There is one black man and his white wife, who own quite a bit of property that live there as well. They are both pillars of their community and they have been for years.
    This story just makes me I'll!
    KTElite

    Answer by KTElite at 4:31 PM on Sep. 22, 2013

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