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Anyone have any suggestions on number recognition?

My oldest son is in Kindergarten and although he does very well most of the time with math, he is having difficulties with the "teen" numbers. Especially 13 and 15 (Since they aren't threeteen and fiveteen) It's recognizing the written number that is the difficulty. He has no problem counting. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

 
njmommy2boys

Asked by njmommy2boys at 8:38 PM on Feb. 26, 2009 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

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Answers (4)
  • How about a hopscotch board? If it's still too cold outside, use painter's tape to make one on the floor. You can start the numbers anywhere you want, even mixing them up in the squares (no one says they must go in order).
    kaycee14

    Answer by kaycee14 at 12:48 PM on Feb. 27, 2009

  • Try printing out a large 13 and a large 15 (or writing the numbers in big print on paper) and taping them up around the house. Every time he passes them, have him say them out loud. Just an idea.
    StarLee

    Answer by StarLee at 8:40 PM on Feb. 26, 2009

  • omg- we had this prob with 11 ... he would just skip it- and anything that had anything to do with 11... we would write in chocolate syrup on his sundaues or ketchup on his hotdog- anyhting to make him just speak the number. to a little kid- those 2 numbers look a lot alike 3 and 5- maybe dyslexia issue? don't give up!
    alwms

    Answer by alwms at 8:49 PM on Feb. 26, 2009

  • Just correct him and eventually he will get it. He understands the concept of 13 apples and 15 oranges and frankly that is what is important. Maybe hang some 13's and 15's around the house and walk past them and say "Look at that 13 just hanging there" after saying that a few times you could later walk past it and say " what did i say that was" and see if he remembers. But i wouldnt sweat it
    TinasTribe

    Answer by TinasTribe at 10:01 PM on Feb. 26, 2009