Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Does anyone have a kid with aspergers?

What age is your child?
What is the biggest struggle YOU have with your child?
And what is your CHILDS biggest struggle?

My 10 year old was diagnosed when he was 3 with autism, then at 5 with aspergers. The biggest struggle I have with my DS is the mood swings. He has such bad mood swings when he gets aggervated. My sons biggest struggle has been understanding the social dynamic, and physical limitations. It has been really hard to teach him to tie his shoes or ride a bike.

Answer Question
 
deneejude

Asked by deneejude at 4:13 PM on Mar. 19, 2009 in Kids' Health

Level 3 (22 Credits)
Answers (8)
  • I have never had my son DX with asperger's because I don't think it would be best for him but I believe he does have a touch of it. He is 5yrs old and the biggest struggle is he is constantly taking things apart. He loves to build and take things apart. He always has a huge supply of batteries that he loves to put in things and take out. Sometimes it's really frustrating that he doesn't play with his own toys but prefers to play with things he shouldn't. My son also has some social issues. He is to touchy with other kids. When he's playing he loves to hold hands and hug and the other kids his age do not like it. I've told him until i'm blue in the face that he doesn't have to get so close or hug kids all the time. As far as physical abilities my son doesn't have them, but he's always been advanced for his age (walking at 6 months) but because he's advanced it makes it hard to keep him away from harmful things.

    legalmommy101

    Answer by legalmommy101 at 4:32 PM on Mar. 19, 2009

  • my daughter is 16, was diagnosed with Pdd and bi polar. I've had many frustrating moments (more than i would want to count or remember). my worst one is her sex acts. she's been having them since age 2, which is known in bi polar and pdd people. she loves to lie, steal and cheat. she doesn't want to use her brain, she wants everyone else to do it for her. i've never been able to break her from that. she loves to manipulate people and use people. ( when i wouldn't let her do something she would have someone call socal service out on me ( 12 times ) got her at age 4. last time i saw social service they told her she can't call everytime she doesn't get her way ( two years ago). she also likes to let everyone think she is good and we , the parents , are mean and she uses that against us with society. it's a fight and a struggle. she gets no help because schools never recognised it because she doesn't look like a problem but she is
    Niecie

    Answer by Niecie at 5:38 PM on Mar. 19, 2009

  • a problem. she's been on homestudies since 7th grade because she loves to manipulate people and start fights with her classmates and always being picked on. she's a hand ful. good luck with yours. hope you have the support. i didn't have any.....
    Niecie

    Answer by Niecie at 5:39 PM on Mar. 19, 2009

  • I have two sons who are a step away from an official diagnosis of PDD-NOS and my oldest also with ADHD.

    My oldest son...his psychologist is "leaning towards" the diagnosis but awaiting the new reports from his re-evals. He's just recently turned 5. My biggest challenge is keeping my cool with him. I know his issues but the repetition of his impulses is becoming more difficult, occurring more often and his questions are becoming more difficult to answer. ("What does a resistor do in a circuit?" "Why does a lightbulb get hot?") The biggest challenge he has is understanding that his "peers" don't understand what he's talking about. His teachers say he's usually avoided because the kids just don't understand him because his vocabulary is so much more advanced than theirs. It doesn't seem to bother him, but he'd rather hang with the adults anyway. He always has. Oh, and the SPD, too. THAT is a tough one too.

    TiccledBlue

    Answer by TiccledBlue at 6:13 PM on Mar. 19, 2009

  • My 3 year old is "so borderline" the doctor had to actually score his ADOS before she could say anything. He is also up for PDD-NOS.

    My challenge with him is his temper. Right now, it seems to be only taken out against his brothers, but something tells me that unless I can figure out how to get him to control his temper, the hitting, pulling and pushing...I'm truly at a loss and don't know what to do. Right now, it's constant time out.

    His challenge...Where his brother can be reasoned with, he cannot. He also has a higher intellect, but he just doesn't "get" it when he's done something wrong. Unless he's hurt his dad or I...even accidently...he becomes EXTREMELY upset. (hurt his brothers? he smiles) Cognitively, he's in Kindergarten already.

    I think he is starting to feel left out, though. He can't run as well as his peers, and he knows it. He's awkward, stiff and not coordinated.
    TiccledBlue

    Answer by TiccledBlue at 6:18 PM on Mar. 19, 2009

  • my dd is 22 and has aspergers. She has come along way with therapy. Her voice has always been low and quiet, communicating is hard for her she cries easy when she doesn't get her way or your thoughts don't match hers, As a kid she would hoard things, even garbage, never wanted to throw anything away. cried and still does when she doesn't get her way and then she does crazy things like stabs a pen through a pear and leaves it under a chair or breaks other people things.
    when she was 10 the school social worker and me decided to form a friendship group for my daughter. She got 4 other girls that were shy and my daughter and they had their own friendship group. my daughter didn't even realize that the group was for her and for her to learn social skills. Her coordination isn't the best, she didn't learn to ride a bike until she was 11 and didn't really get the balancing of the bike until 16.
    wheresthewayout

    Answer by wheresthewayout at 1:18 PM on Mar. 20, 2009

  • does anyone know what to do with these type of kids?
    Niecie

    Answer by Niecie at 6:31 PM on Mar. 20, 2009

  • The same things you do with neurotypical kids, but with more patience and over a longer period of time.
    TiccledBlue

    Answer by TiccledBlue at 8:10 PM on Mar. 20, 2009

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.
close Cafemom Join now to connect to other members! Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN