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Does the breast always have milk?

I know this may be a silly question, but, is there always milk in the breast? I ask because my baby kept pulling on my breasts today as if she wasn't getting enough. Earlier, I had pumped an hour prior because she fell asleep and wanted to keep up milk production. So I thought "maybe I depleted all my milk" by pumping so when she was ready to go to the breast I didn't have enough to satisfy her. Could that happen? I

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 8:50 PM on Mar. 24, 2009 in Babies (0-12 months)

Answers (4)
  • Yes it always produces milk (untill you have weaned anyway) But it can get deppleted to the point it doesnt come at a fast rate like theyare used to, but something will come out, make sense?
    AK_aries

    Answer by AK_aries at 8:51 PM on Mar. 24, 2009

  • AK aries - hey there - I disagree with your statement. I am 50 and still have milk. I have had milk since I had my child last child 9 years ago. It does not go away after weaning.
    tash2texas

    Answer by tash2texas at 8:58 PM on Mar. 24, 2009

  • Yes, your breasts are always producing milk and are never empty. Check out the article "How Mother's Milk is Made" at http://llli.org/llleaderweb/LV/LVJunJul01p54.html


    "The emptier the breast is, the faster it tries to refill - similar to an automatic icemaker. Hartmann says the rate of milk synthesis in women ranges from 11 to 58 ml/hour/breast, or about 1/3 of an ounce to 2 ounces per breast per hour. Emptier breasts make milk faster than fuller ones. When milk is regularly and thoroughly removed from the breast, milk synthesis is unrestricted."

    maggiemom2000

    Answer by maggiemom2000 at 9:03 PM on Mar. 24, 2009

  • If you're nursing, you're always producing milk. It sounds like your LO is going through a growth spurt. Yes, you may have taken some of what she would have eaten when you pumped. Your breasts are always producing milk, but they may not be able to keep up with the baby nursing at that moment. I've had that problem, while my son was going through a growth spurt, and I just had to keep switching him back and forth for the tiny bit that had been made while my hubby got a bottle of pumped milk ready.
    musicpisces

    Answer by musicpisces at 2:23 AM on Mar. 25, 2009

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