• In the Spotlight:
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

My daugther father was apoted dose his apoted mother have the right to claim to have grandparnets right when she not the real grandmother?

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 11:41 AM on Mar. 29, 2009 in Adoption

Answers (27)
  • I think she does, she's the mom in every way other then him coming out of her body. I'm not really sure though.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:50 AM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • A common misconception, there is no such thing as grandparent rights. Trust me, went thru this whole thing recently. The ONLY way "grandparent rights" would ever be enforced is if ONE of the parents of the child is dead. Otherwise, no judge will grant it, regardless of the situation. As for your child's father's adoptive mom.................technically yes. She is the guardian and considered the parent of your child's father.
    TheDiva320

    Answer by TheDiva320 at 12:00 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • I would say yes but I dont know anything about grandparents rights. But if she is his mom legaly then she is legaly your childs grandparent. Why would she not be considered grandma?
    AK_aries

    Answer by AK_aries at 12:13 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • Check your state laws. I don't know every state, but I know mine does not recognize the rights of any family members except the parents except in cases where another family member actually had custody (due to extreme circumstances). If your husband was legally adopted, then his adopted mother has the same rights as a mother who birthed & raised her child. That is the definition of adoption--taking on the rights & responsibilities of the child. This gives her the same rights as any other biological grandparent (which is probably none, but again, check your state laws).
    funnyface1204

    Answer by funnyface1204 at 12:46 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • funnyface1204 is correct!
    ZaTa

    Answer by ZaTa at 1:25 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • In the eyes of the law, she is the legal grandparent. But grandparent rights laws vary from state to state.

    Is his Mother in his life? Does he see her as the grandparent to your children?

    Is there a reason his adoptive mom is pursuing grandparent rights?
    randi1978

    Answer by randi1978 at 3:07 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • Legally she is the REAL grandmother. I don't know anything about grandparent rights because there truley aren't any in my state, but once your child's father was adopted by this woman, she became his real and legal mother, so if your state does recognize grandparent rights, then she is 100% eligible.
    MommyAddie

    Answer by MommyAddie at 4:12 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • The word real does not belong in adoption. Adoptees have two mothers by definition. The mother that birthed them and the mother that raised them. They are both very real. To discount either of them as not real is disrespectful to the adoptee.


    As far as rights, are you talking about legal rights, because there is not such thing as grandparent rights. If you are asking if she has the moral right to be called grandmother, yes she does.

    onethentwins

    Answer by onethentwins at 4:45 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • If there WAS grandparents rights, yes she could claim them. She is his mother in every way that matters just like his birth mom. And for YOU to say she isn't the real GM is kinda crappy. She raised him she deserves a part in your child's life if they still have a relationship. I would feel awful if my son's baby momma claimed I wasn't their child's GM because I wasn't his "real mom" I am his only mom.
    matthewscandi

    Answer by matthewscandi at 4:59 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

  • In this state there are grandparent rights and I know from doing a research paper on it and having seen cases in the law office where I worked that there are restrictions on it. The parents have to not be together (either one is deceased or they're divorced) and contact between the grandchild and grandparent(s) has been completely denied. If those two things have not happened then the grandparent would not have cause to bring a case in court.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:10 PM on Mar. 29, 2009

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.