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What do you think of the de-baptism movement?

Yahoo news has an article about "100,000 secular Britons seek 'de-baptism'."I gather that this is a response to infant baptism and is an effort to renounce it. The National Secular Society is even providing de-baptism certificates for sale. A Google search for "de-baptism" will turn up a ton of relevant hits.

 
isabellalecour

Asked by isabellalecour at 2:50 PM on Apr. 2, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 26 (26,599 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (21)
  • I think, if someone feels they werent given the opportunity to decide for themselves if baptism was what they wanted that they should do what they feel is necessary to announce that.
    If it means this de-baptism thing, so be it.

    It should be their choice, always, whether or not to be baptized. Done in infancy or pressured means nothing in the end. I mean, when you think about it...if they dont feel it, then the baptism means nothing anyway so they might as well put it on paper "officially".
    BonesDragonDew

    Answer by BonesDragonDew at 3:42 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • The certificates declares:

    "Certificate of Debaptism

    I ________ having been subjected to the Rite of Christian Baptism in infancy (before reaching an age of consent), hereby publicly revoke any implications of that Rite and renounce the Church that carried it out. In the name of human reason, I reject all its Creeds and all other such superstition in particular, the perfidious belief that any baby needs to be cleansed by Baptism of alleged ORIGINAL SIN, and the evil power of supposed demons. I wish to be excluded henceforth from enhanced claims of church membership numbers based on past baptismal statistics used, for example, for the purpose of securing legislative privilege.”
    isabellalecour

    Answer by isabellalecour at 2:58 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • Wow! It would hurt me if my child de-baptized as this was such a special event in our lives. I'm one to believe that parents should raise their child in their religion but also giving chances to experience/study others and in the end they could make their own decision. But to de-baptize doesn't sit right with me. My MIL on the other hand believes, let your kids run wild and they'll pick what they want....4 of the 5 don't practice anything (my husband does believe in God but doesn't attend church) and 1 is a Wiccan/Pagan/Who knows what who thinks he can cast spells and all that.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:09 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • This is why I don't believe in baptizing infants. I believe that a person should make that choice for themselves. I do, however, agree with infant/child dedication where the parents and members of the church declare to be there for that child and to raise them in a Christian home. That wouldn't need a certificate because it's more for the adults than the child. And it was a truly special time in my husband's and my life. We stood before our entire congregation and pledged to raise our child knowing God.

    Personally I think it's one more way for people to slam Christianity. Don't want to believe? Then don't. Having to have a "certificate" is more of a slap in the face to the families who do baptize their children. Shame on them.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:24 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • Where do I sign up?!
    MamaK88

    Answer by MamaK88 at 3:33 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • Eh.... I think it's a lot of people with too much time on their hands, really.

    While I believe it's utterly ridiculous to baptise a child into a religion -- long before they understand the slightest thing about it & w/o being given the option to learn about other religions -- and expect them to live up to that throughout their lives, getting what is essentially a quick spongebath while someone says pretty words is harmless.
    Laura1229

    Answer by Laura1229 at 3:43 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • I agree with Laura . . .

    If you're that worried about the fact that you were baptized as an infant . . . well, there are just worse things you could be worrying about than that, IMO. Who cares, really? I mean, do you REALLY think it's going to affect you in the grand scheme of things? I seriously doubt it.


    jennijune_21

    Answer by jennijune_21 at 3:59 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • Well, it's kind of a good gesture for sending a message of protest to religious parents who do baptism. I'm sure that's all it is. No harm. And I'm sure they don't take it seriously. It's just a statement about how they feel.
    witchqueen

    Answer by witchqueen at 4:09 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • I would suspect people in the UK feel more strongly about it because it is a state religion. You aren't just baptized into the church, you are baptized into the government's religion. While it's not as huge a part of life today as it once was, for some it's a matter of principle. They weren't baptized - they were indoctrinated by the state.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:10 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

  • Answered at 3:10 PM on Apr. 2, 2009 by: NotPanicking
    I would suspect people in the UK feel more strongly about it because it is a state religion. You aren't just baptized into the church, you are baptized into the government's religion. While it's not as huge a part of life today as it once was, for some it's a matter of principle. They weren't baptized - they were indoctrinated by the state.

    **
    That's a good point. I didn't think about that. I always thought the UK was pretty much like we were in the religion area.
    jennijune_21

    Answer by jennijune_21 at 4:15 PM on Apr. 2, 2009

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