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Did the doctors violate their oath?

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090407/wl_nm/us_usa_torture_redcross

The Red Cross is saying doctors that assisted the military while they were torturing terror suspects violated their oath...do you think they did?

Answer Question
 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 10:36 PM on Apr. 7, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (10)
  • Last I heard, all medical schools do their own oath - which is either a modified version of the Hippocratic, or something else entirely. It is not considered legally or even ethically binding, apparently - I was surprised when I learned that since I had assumed that they all pledged and were held to "First do no harm..." but that isn't the case. I guess it's considered a rite of passage, but pretty optional.
    As for the news story, I absolutely think it is wretchedly unethical and immoral - I don't care what oath you took.
    Collinsky

    Answer by Collinsky at 10:47 PM on Apr. 7, 2009

  • Boo hoo, a terror suspect got waterboarded. Better waterboarding than having their heads chopped off. Do you think they had a doctor handy to sedate the victims before then beheaded them? You can't play nice with terrorsts.
    yourspecialkid

    Answer by yourspecialkid at 1:30 AM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • Boo hoo, a terror suspect got waterboarded. Better waterboarding than having their heads chopped off. Do you think they had a doctor handy to sedate the victims before then beheaded them? You can't play nice with terrorsts.


    Makes sense.

    mustbeGRACE

    Answer by mustbeGRACE at 7:34 AM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • "The prisoners told the ICRC they were beaten and kicked, left naked for long periods, subjected to sleep deprivation, loud music, cold temperatures, rape threats and forced shaving. Some said they were denied solid food unless they cooperated with interrogators and one said he was confined in a crouching position in a box too short to stand in."

    I'm with yourspecialkid. BOOO HOOO! OMG They were shaved? How HORRIBLE! And what is their accusers saying about them? oh waaaa. If someone killed one of my children, and held them in a basement and then cut their heads off, or did unspeakable acts, you bet your booty I would "stand them naked, shave their heads, let them hear loud music, not let them get plenty of sleep and not feed them lunch, or give them soup instead, even if they were in the same room and didn't even touch my child, and THEN I would cut their b##ls off in little pieces. Well, given the opportunity.
    lifeasinoit

    Answer by lifeasinoit at 8:14 AM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • NOPE.
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 8:31 AM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • You all do realize that some of these men who were tortured and abused did absolutely nothing wrong. Unless you count being Muslim in the wrong place at the wrong time. These are not convected terrorists. These people didn't "touch your children". They are fathers, sons and brothers. How would you feel if it was your family?
    Imaginaryfriend

    Answer by Imaginaryfriend at 8:35 AM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • Has to say ditto to yourspecialkid
    mamakirs

    Answer by mamakirs at 1:29 PM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • While the moral code of those medical professionals involved may be questionable, I do not believe they violated the oath. They were involved in the interrogation only as gauges for the limits of the human body during interrogation procedures. "Do no harm" can not be applied here, as the medical professionals themselves can not regulate the governments forms of interrogation. They were; in fact, monitoring the health of the individuals being interrogated and did not ask to do so under such circumstances. "To preserve dignity" applies to the individual while undergoing medical treatment, not in a broad general circumstance. "To act in the best intrest" is the only one that may be complicated, as the medical professionals would "clear" an individual as in good enough "health" to under-go more interrogation. From a procedrual standpoint, this may have crossed into breaking that part of the oath, but once again, it usually CONT..
    ozarkgirl3

    Answer by ozarkgirl3 at 7:12 PM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • CONT..

    applies to a patient during medical treatment. Like I said, morally it may have been questionable...but in the end, it all really boils down to sematics. I would like to believe that they did the best that they could do when placed in their situation as I don't think that many people openly applied to work under those conditions as medical personnel.
    ozarkgirl3

    Answer by ozarkgirl3 at 7:13 PM on Apr. 8, 2009

  • You all do realize that some of these men who were tortured and abused did absolutely nothing wrong. Unless you count being Muslim in the wrong place at the wrong time. These are not convected terrorists. These people didn't "touch your children". They are fathers, sons and brothers. How would you feel if it was your family?


    Thank you!

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 11:27 PM on Apr. 8, 2009

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