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Religion and Civic Duty

A spin off from the Gay marriage Q&A.
Can you separate your religion from your civic duty? Can you sit on a jury and rule according to the law without influence of your religion? Can you participate in civil elections without consideration from your religion? Can you truly vote according to the law and the greater good?

Or are you voting to further your religions aims and goals? Are you voting according to what your preacher wants you to vote? Are you making judgments on a jury according to your own views of religion?

Does civic duty even play a role in your life? Do you agree with and wish to uphold the laws of the land? The US Constitution and the Bill of Rights? Do those documents have any meaning to you at all?

 
isabellalecour

Asked by isabellalecour at 3:26 PM on Apr. 22, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 26 (26,599 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (11)
  • "give to Ceaser what is Ceaser's", lol
    my beliefs are universal - i don't believe in religious exclusivity or absolutism, therefore i respect the different beliefs of others, and believe that i have a moral obligation, and a civil obligation, but i cannot force any sort of religious obligation onto others - meaning that i will support what i believe is moral (pro-life, pro-homosexual rights, etc) based on my heart and the law, not my beliefs (religiously speaking), and i will uphold my civil duties, without letting my religious opinions infringe upon those other areas of my life, as i understand (and even appreciate) the difference in opinion and belief of others.
    =)
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 4:01 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • Since I'm Agnostic, then yes, I can seperate my civic duty from my religious convictions. Sometimes that means standing up for something I may not believe in, but that means I'm standing up for that person's American freedom; which IMO should be every American's goal.
    ozarkgirl3

    Answer by ozarkgirl3 at 3:38 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • Can you separate your religion from your civic duty? Can you sit on a jury and rule according to the law without influence of your religion? Can you participate in civil elections without consideration from your religion? Can you truly vote according to the law and the greater good? Does civic duty even play a role in your life? Do you agree with and wish to uphold the laws of the land? The US Constitution and the Bill of Rights? Do those documents have any meaning to you at all?


    Yes, to all of the above. Life is about balance. It is a must to balance religion, politics, legality, civic duty and life as a whole in order to have equality.

    hannahwill

    Answer by hannahwill at 3:59 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • Well i believe what i believe and that shapes me and my morals. I think that it goes hand in hand with me. Yes, i believe in the constitution and all that. That is the basis of the nation and we live according to that in the US. But i also go by a greater law, but it doesnt hinder what I need to do in my country. I think that my beliefs add to my patriotism. I think i am a better citizen because of my beliefs, my morals, my ethics. I do not go and kill someone because i believe it is wrong Biblically and nationally... So I think that if i was a on jury I could better serve my country having these beliefs..... Blessiings.....
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:15 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • Honestly, my faith comes first in all aspects of my life and everything else comes second. I am civic minded, and I am a woman who votes. I whole heartedly believe in the constitution. Too bad our leaders dont anymore. If I were on a jury, I would listen to the facts and make a decision based on that. Simple.
    duckigrrl

    Answer by duckigrrl at 4:22 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • AMEN! duckigrrl! You hit the nail on the head with that response!
    stvmen88

    Answer by stvmen88 at 4:36 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • I don't vote because we as Jehovah's Witnesses view ourselves as followers of God first in that we are united Citizens under his Kingdom Rule and will not allow mans ruler-ship to divide us, but we can serve on jury's (each person must do according to their conscience in this matter) in certain matters because we are only asked to look at facts and give our thought on what is presented.

    lisarose45

    Answer by lisarose45 at 4:56 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • As far as a jury, yes I could be impartial. I understand that America is a secular state not a theocracy. So I would go by the law of the land. People may have violated God's law and He will judge them in eternity, however, I'm not God and my task is to judge by the civil law of the nation.


    As far a voting, I do not believe that righteousness according to Gods law will come from Washington DC, or from Congress, or any state or local government.  While you want moral leaders that doesn't automatically exclude those of other faiths or those who have no formal religion.  The fact is that this country was founded on freedom of religion or freedom from the practice of formal religion.  So I vote on many issues, most are not moral in nature. 


    So my question to the original poster is this why the question?  Are you truly seeking opinions or preaching your own view?

    teamquinn

    Answer by teamquinn at 7:28 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • as citizens of this country, voting 'according to the law' means having the proper requirements per person enabling their right to cast a vote..it has nothing to do with their religion, their pastor's thoughts, or their families. anyone is capable of making up their own mind, when they cast their vote. just because someone doesn't agree with you (in general), doesn't mean its because they are conservative thinkers/christian/whatever, or that someone else decided what they should vote. not everyone is as blind as the opposite side wants to think. in fact, most people, if CM is any indication, vote according to their own thoughts/beliefs. also, how one lives their life, and how the law sees it, is two different things; thus, just because someone votes differently, doesn't mean they are ignoring legal documents. this country is still a democracy, isn't it? that's why everyone should vote, one way or another.
    thehairnazi

    Answer by thehairnazi at 7:31 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

  • Well, since our laws are based on the Mayflower Compact which was based on the 10 Commandments, then I am doing my civic duty. If you check it out, God laid down the death penalty right after Noah and his clan got off the ark. He gave them a set of rules. One of these was that if a man shed blood, his blood shall also be shed - death penalty. No, I don't have a problem at all.
    jesse123456

    Answer by jesse123456 at 7:45 PM on Apr. 22, 2009

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