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Hi am only 18 turning 19 in May 14.....

I'm an illegal in the u.s. But i got married to a u.s citizen and we have a son together. I talked to a lawyer n he told me to go back to mexico before i turn 19 and that will help my case? he also gave me other options but i'm willing to go with this one. Now should i believe him? and take that risk of never coming back to my family?): please i need an answer before may 14!!!!!!!!

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LEDESMAFAMiiLY

Asked by LEDESMAFAMiiLY at 1:45 PM on May. 1, 2009 in Travel

Level 1 (0 Credits)
Answers (11)
  • Hm. Stick with the lawyer.
    lilbit022009

    Answer by lilbit022009 at 1:50 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • What was the reason he gave you for returning to Mexico? If I were you I would look on this site

    http://www.usimmigrationsupport.org/citizenship_application.html?gclid=CPXrzILXm5oCFRwpawod2zOP9A

    Do some research for yourself first.
    2-1CavWife

    Answer by 2-1CavWife at 1:50 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • As far as I know (dont quote me though) if you give birth to a child within the US then you can stay, I think its the same for marriage. I would look more into it though and get more opinions:)
    SabrenaLeigh

    Answer by SabrenaLeigh at 1:52 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • Sorry this one, then you can go to the other one to pay to have the packet sent to you.

    http://www.usimmigrationsupport.org/
    2-1CavWife

    Answer by 2-1CavWife at 1:53 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • Eligibility for naturalization
    To become a naturalized United States citizen, one must be at least eighteen years of age at the time of filing, a legal permanent resident of the United States, and have had a status of a legal permanent resident in the United States for five years less 90 days before they apply (this requirement is reduced to three years less 90 days if they (a) acquired legal permanent resident status, (b) have been married to and living with a citizen for the past three years and (c) the spouse has been a U.S. citizen for at least three years prior to the applicant applying for naturalization.) They must have been physically present for at least 30 months of 60 months prior to the date of filing their application. Also during those 60 months if the legal permanent resident was outside of the U.S. for a continuous period of 6 months or more they are disqualified from naturalizing (certain exceptions apply for
    2-1CavWife

    Answer by 2-1CavWife at 1:59 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • naturalization.) They must have been physically present for at least 30 months of 60 months prior to the date of filing their application. Also during those 60 months if the legal permanent resident was outside of the U.S. for a continuous period of 6 months or more they are disqualified from naturalizing (certain exceptions apply for those continuous periods of six months to 1 year). They must be a "person of good moral character", and must pass a test on United States history and government.[5][6] Most applicants must also have a working knowledge of the English language.[5] There are exceptions, introduced in 1990, for long-resident older applicants and those with mental or physical disabilities.[7][8] This requirement for an ability to read, write, and speak English is not regarded as too difficult, since the test requires that applicants read and write in English.
    2-1CavWife

    Answer by 2-1CavWife at 2:00 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • Maybe get an opinion from another lawyer first. Is your hubby willing to go to Mexico to be with you?
    Nikky0803PAG

    Answer by Nikky0803PAG at 2:04 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • You might want to check into applying for a green card to start with, so that you can stay in the country for the five year requirement (which ends up being shortened to 3 since you are married to a citizen) inorder to file for citizenship. The green card will give you the "legal residence" you need to file for naturalization. You might also want to check the family reunification, I dont know if that will apply to you or not, but it is worth a try.

    If I were you, unless I was being deported I wouldn't go back and leave my family.
    2-1CavWife

    Answer by 2-1CavWife at 2:07 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • My husband isn't from here and they did not tell him to go back they say he has a right to stay here only if immigration asks tell him he has to go back to get a visa he then would have to go but to a specific location and he could be there from one week to 6 months that all depends on immigration and the judge... Plus they need evidance that you have been here for as long as you have.
    mvsmomshorty

    Answer by mvsmomshorty at 2:13 PM on May. 1, 2009

  • I'd take my chances here. Lets see we have drug wars, earthquakes, swine flu epidemic and a good chance they might shut down the borders if these things dont get better. No way I'd go to Mexico right now
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:55 PM on May. 1, 2009

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