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Does anyone know how the actual Canon (NT) was formed?

I hear all this talk if they left the books in...


do you know what books were put in the Bible, when and why? Gospels were not taken out---it is by the Holy Spirit certain books were included.

Now, if you do not believe in the guidance of the Holy Spirit you would not believe ANY portion of the Cannon and so books put in or left out would make no difference to you what so ever.
(NOW YOU CAN FOCUS ON THE MESSAGE)

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 2:40 PM on May. 4, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

This question is closed.
Answers (24)
  • The term "canon" is used to describe the books that are divinely inspired and therefore belong in the Bible. The difficult aspect of determining the biblical canon is that the Bible does not give us a list of the books that belong in the Bible. Determining the canon was a process, first by Jewish rabbis and scholars, and then later by early Christians. Ultimately, it was God who decided what books belonged in the biblical canon. A book of Scripture belonged in the canon from the moment God inspired its writing. It was simply a matter of God convincing His human followers which books should be included in the Bible.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:59 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • Don't like the truth so you delete it?

    A guy gathered all the version he could get his hands on, which were all different, and picked and chose the books he liked. If he didn't have a copy it was discredited out of hand, even if he'd never read it.

    Go ahead, delete it again.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 2:44 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • Facts are facts....wait isn't this how things got left out of history to begin with?
    pnwmom

    Answer by pnwmom at 2:47 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • It's been a long time since I've studied Christian Bible at all but as I recall, there was a gathering at . . . Nicea I think in about the 3rd century of church leaders around the known world. At that conference, they decided which books were going to be in the canon. They had a criteria which, again, I don't remember the details of, to determine which books were going to be included.
    eema.gray

    Answer by eema.gray at 2:47 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • mighty convenient

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:48 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • Don't like the truth so you delete it?

    A guy gathered all the version he could get his hands on, which were all different, and picked and chose the books he liked. If he didn't have a copy it was discredited out of hand, even if he'd never read it.

    Go ahead, delete it again.


     


    The other one was deleted because someone was concerned that I put 2 "Ns" in the word Canon. But you are wrong.   "A guy" did NOT gather all the books he could put his hands on..and entire council made the choice.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:51 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • It's been a long time since I've studied Christian Bible at all but as I recall, there was a gathering at . . . Nicea I think in about the 3rd century of church leaders around the known world. At that conference, they decided which books were going to be in the canon. They had a criteria which, again, I don't remember the details of, to determine which books were going to be included.


    This is VERY accurate. Of course there is more to it and it happened over years not just one meeting. I have to get my son now or I would elaborate. You are correct, it was a council not just a guy finding the books he can get his hands on.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:54 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/index.htm


    Nicea was a single conference.  Eventually the Church assigned a single cleric to revise it and take out what they didn't like.  King James had another conference of his own.  You can see all the ones that were left out, put back in, taken out again on the chart at that link

    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 2:55 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • Eventually the Church assigned a single cleric to revise it and take out what they didn't like.

    WRONG!
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:58 PM on May. 4, 2009

  • Compared to the New Testament, there was very little controversy over the canon of the Old Testament. Hebrew believers recognized God’s messengers, and accepted their writings as inspired of God. While there was undeniably some debate in regards to the Old Testament canon, by 250 A.D. there was nearly universal agreement on the canon of Hebrew Scripture. The only issue that remained was the Apocrypha, with some debate and discussion continuing today. The vast majority of Hebrew scholars considered the Apocrypha to be good historical and religious documents, but not on the same level as the Hebrew Scriptures.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:59 PM on May. 4, 2009

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