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Is it true that a parent can enrolled a child in Private School and not pay a cent?

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 8:48 AM on May. 12, 2009 in General Parenting

This question is closed.
Answers (12)
  • True what the above poster said. But that is very difficult to do and very rarely does it happen. A school district will fight you tooth and nail. Your child would have to have a serious learning issue where the current public options are not able to minimally provide for your child's educational needs. Schools that are private try and get us to attend - free. That is because my child is a minority and they are looking to be more "diverse." I do not accept that because my child will never be the token child. I appreciate what the schools are trying to do but they don't want to really achieve diviersity they just want to have one or two non white students to show how open minded they are.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:12 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • Not around me. However if your kid is really smart they could get a scholarship. I guess in some states they might have programs for that but in mine no.

    babyfat5

    Answer by babyfat5 at 8:52 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • be more specific. All private schools have tuition that has to be paid by someone. They do have scholarships and financial aid available for some students.
    momofsaee

    Answer by momofsaee at 8:53 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • true if you can prove that the public school is the culprit for your child's not progressing you could sue the district to pay for a private placement.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 8:58 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • What state are you in? Here in Ohio we have Edchoice.


    The Ohio Educational Choice Scholarship program (EdChoice) provides a limited number of scholarships to students who attend persistently under-performing public schools. The scholarship, sometimes called a voucher, must be used to attend a participating chartered nonpublic school.


    It does not matter what your income is, they do not go by that but how the school is. Maybe you have something similar in your state.


     

    Christine0813

    Answer by Christine0813 at 9:14 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • The Ohio Educational Choice Scholarship program (EdChoice) provides a limited number of scholarships to students who attend persistently under-performing public schools. The scholarship, sometimes called a voucher, must be used to attend a participating chartered nonpublic school. It does not matter what your income is, they do not go by that but how the school is. Maybe you have something similar in your state.


     


    This is new for me thanks for the info.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:21 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • I take it that you are in Ohio? Would you like the web site? It shows all the schools that are participating and what county. One rule though, once enrolled you can't move to another city or you lose it but you are free to move within the city you reside.

    Christine0813

    Answer by Christine0813 at 9:25 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • Only with a scholarship or voucher
    Zakysmommy

    Answer by Zakysmommy at 9:53 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • We live in Toledo Ohio and my children go on the edchoice program to local catholic schools. Your particular school, not the district, but the school your child would actually have to attend has to be on the school in crisis list. The nice thing about it is, once you are granted that scholarship, it is good for the remainder of the childs education. If your child is already in school, they must attend spring semester in that school in crisis to be eligible, if they are entering K then they do not have to attend one semester. But that scholarship is good through the 12th grade once granted. The cut off this year was Good Friday, you had to be applied and accepted by then.
    salexander

    Answer by salexander at 10:11 AM on May. 12, 2009

  • IN NY under the regulations of NCLB if your child is in a school known as a persistently dangerous school ( the list is in their website) you could transfer your child to another school even private school.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:43 AM on May. 12, 2009