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The bible is mythology...

This statement was made in an earlier post and someone got very upset...

This is dictionary.com's deffinition of Myth...
1. a traditional or legendary story, usually concerning some being or hero or event, with or without a determinable basis of fact or a natural explanation, esp. one that is concerned with deities or demigods and explains some practice, rite, or phenomenon of nature.
2. stories or matter of this kind: realm of myth.
3. any invented story, idea, or concept: His account of the event is pure myth.
4. an imaginary or fictitious thing or person.
5. an unproved or false collective belief that is used to justify a social institution.

So, let me ask you this... How is the bible NOT a myth? Many see stories of Pandora or Morgain LeFay to be myth also, but to those that believe they are every bit as factual as the Bible.

So, what's your take? Is the bible myth? And does that mean it can't be true?

Answer Question
 
SabrinaMBowen

Asked by SabrinaMBowen at 1:58 AM on May. 17, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 40 (122,988 Credits)
Answers (37)
  • Yep, the bible is a myth. Just like santy clause
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:03 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • I don't believe the Bible is a myth. Sure, there are things we can't explain now, but with God all things are possible. Things were WAY different back then than it is now, so just because we understand the earth and science of today doesn't mean we understand thousands of years ago. this is IMO, i'm not trying to start an argument.
    armywife43

    Answer by armywife43 at 2:03 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • But just because it's a myth doesn't mean it's not true. It could be... It's just unprooven.... Which the bible is! So, that by definition makes it myth...
    SabrinaMBowen

    Answer by SabrinaMBowen at 2:05 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/william-tyndale.html
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:05 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • The Betrayal and Death of William Tyndale

    Tyndale was betrayed by a friend, Philips, the agent either of Henry or of English ecclesiastics, or possibly of both. Tyndale was arrested and imprisoned in the castle of Vilvoorden for over 500 days of horrible conditions. He was tried for heresy and treason in a ridiculously unfair trial, and convicted. Tyndale was then strangled and burnt at the stake in the prison yard, Oct. 6, 1536. His last words were, "Lord, open the king of England's eyes." This prayer was answered three years later, in the publication of King Henry VIII’s 1539 English “Great Bible”.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:08 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • Tyndale's place in history has not yet been sufficiently recognized as a translator of the Scriptures, as an apostle of liberty, and as a chief promoter of the Reformation in England. In all these respects his influence has been singularly under-valued. The sweeping statement found in almost all histories, that Tyndale translated from the Vulgate and Luther, is most damaging to the reputation of the writers who make it; for, as a matter of fact, it is contrary to truth, since his translations are made directly from the originals, with the aid of the Erasmus 1516 Greek-Latin New Testament, and the best available Hebrew texts. The Prolegomena in Mombert's William Tyndale's Five Books of Moses show conclusively that Tyndale's Pentateuch is a translation of the Hebrew original.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:09 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • just like witches, faries, gobblins, and elves. awww. too bad
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:10 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • well if you go by the first definition then i guess you can say it's a myth. but that's if you go by definition. some people, like me, just go by their heart, not definition. I believe in my heart that it's all truth, none of it fiction.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:15 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • *just like witches, faries, gobblins, and elves. awww. too bad*


    I doubt the witches on here would argue with you that faeries, goblins, and elves are myth. But that doesn't mean they can't believe in them, only that they can't prove their existence. Same goes for the bible.

    mandaday

    Answer by mandaday at 2:15 AM on May. 17, 2009

  • when you use the word myth, you are asking for trouble. most ppl wont read the definition you posted, but will just assume you mean myth as in "not true" or "just a silly story" and will immediately take offense.

    i think its wrong to call anyone's belief a myth in a forum like this. it doesnt achieve anything & just insights others to anger.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 2:19 AM on May. 17, 2009

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