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getting enough breastmilk?

Is it normal for my 9 month-old breastfed daughter to wake up after 10 hours of sleep with a dry diaper? Maybe there was a little in there absorbed by the diaper, but it was really hard to tell. She nurses every 2-3 hours, and I always breastfeed her before giving her solids -- and she STILL is ravenous with her solids, even after a milk feeding. Is there a chance she's not getting enough milk?

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EmilySusan

Asked by EmilySusan at 7:59 AM on Jun. 11, 2009 in Babies (0-12 months)

Level 5 (79 Credits)
Answers (13)
  • I had seriously the same thing happen and it turned out my supply was dropping. Dry diaper in morning, she ate every 3 hours, and she'd always get breast before solids. But my supply had dropped enough that she wasn't getting enough food from me. We ended up supplementing with formula (which isn't good for your milk supply, but at least the baby is getting fed).

    Get in to a lactation consultant to see what you can do about your supply, and also get in with your child's pediatrician to see if she's gaining weight and ask him/her what you should do. But don't feel bad if you need to supplement, when I asked this question all but one answer was to stay away from formula and keep nursing, but looking at my child I just couldn't starve her until my milk supply came up, and I chose to supplement and I cannot tell you the difference in my baby once she was getting fed!!
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 8:46 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • you can try eating oatmeal, drinking enough water, and maybe even taking fenugreek. 9 mos is another growth spurt time. is she having enough wet diapers throughout the day? how long does she sleep for? are you changing her diaper as soon as she wakes up? if you think your supply is dropping, can you pump a little to try to increase your supply? your baby won't starve in the time it takes to increase your supply. how often is she getting solids? they are still not meant for nutrition, just tasting and experience! breastmilk should be her main source of nutrition.
    kyriesmommy13

    Answer by kyriesmommy13 at 9:14 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • can you try to nurse her more often? that will help your supply as well. offer as often as you can, if she's hungry, she will eat; if not, she won't. it doesn't hurt to offer. if you can, contact a lc. unless your pedi is pro-breastfeeding or educated about breastfeeding, they may just tell you to start supplementing. babies should get breastmilk for at least the first year, and it is suggested that it continue for the first 2 yrs. obviously it is your choice, but you made it this far, why even give formula at this point (unless there really is no other option)? have you been to any la leche meetings? they are extremely helpful-llli.org. also, some of the breastfeeding groups here are awesome. support and knowledge are key to continuing a successful breastfeeding relationship!
    kyriesmommy13

    Answer by kyriesmommy13 at 9:24 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • Well you made it 9 months which is a really good thing. However if your daughter seems like she is not wetting enough maybe you should be trying her on juice as well as water maybe start some formula now, and it will be a little easier to ween her later. You did awesome making it this long they say the critical time to breast feed is the first 6 months. I only made it 3 months with my oldest daughter and she wasn't getting enough milk and was always hungry and had terrible colic. Once i switched to the formula she was fine.
    jmann83

    Answer by jmann83 at 9:42 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • Wow, really bad advice. there is no need for juice, water, or formula...

    My daughter stopped wetting her diaper at night around 9-10 months old and she was getting PLENTY of breastmilk. Never had supply issues at all. How are the wet diapers during the day? Also, peeing dies down as a child gets older.

    My daughter is 2 1/2 and she hasn't worn a diaper at night since she was a little less than 2. NO need, she never wet them at all. I could have kept her out of them earlier, but was always worried about *what if* since we co slept.

    Also, she could have peed once and in a disposable it's VERY hard to tell with 1 pee. If it was cloth, it would be easier to tell.

    I wouldn't worry, she sounds like she's eating enough during the day. (My pedi never worried either, he's very pro breastfeeding and said it was normal for some babies)
    celticreverie

    Answer by celticreverie at 9:58 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • i agree with celticreverie, juice is not necessary (or good) for babies. (for older babies) offering a small amount of water throughout the day is okay, but if you feel like you have supply issues then it is better to stick with breastmilk alone. breastmilk has all the water a baby needs in it. it is amazing stuff! and for the pp that said only the first 6 months are critical, that is not true. the aap recommends breastfeeding for AT LEAST the first year, and every other health organization recommends for AT LEAST the first 2 years (and as long as mutually desired after that). why do you think the formula (cheap, wanna be breastmilk) companies are marketing formula for the second year? because that is how long babies are supposed to be breastfed for (at the minimum).
    kyriesmommy13

    Answer by kyriesmommy13 at 10:12 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • How is she pee'ing during the day? 6-8 wet diapers a day is your best indication she's getting enough. I know many babies that stay dry at night, which will be a good thing when she potty trains :)
    PB_J

    Answer by PB_J at 10:24 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • My daughter is almost 9 months and I would freak out if she woke up completely dry! It's one thing for an almost 2 yr old to sleep dry at night, but generally a 9 month old is still wetting diapers at night, at least a little bit.

    I would call your doctor's office if she hasn't had a wet diaper yet and ask them if you should be concerned. If you can keep breast feeding that is great, but if she isn't getting enough breast milk and you can't increase your supply quickly then it's better to have a formula fed baby than a hungry baby. Hopefully everything is just fine though and you can keep nursing! But I would definitely call the doctor in this case, it doesn't hurt to call and ask. GL!
    julipickle2

    Answer by julipickle2 at 10:29 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • OP here: Don't worry ladies... I'm not going to do juice (my 2 year-old doesn't have juice, either). Here's the thing, I am educated about breastfeeding and the importance of it... Here's a little more info: At around 4-5 months I was having what seemed like supply issues (my daughter nursed around the clock and constantly for like 3 weeks in a row) so I started supplementing. But I immediately regretted it and worked really hard for a few weeks and got back to just breastmilk, which she's been on since about 5 months and 1 week. But even then she needed to eat about every hour and a half or sometimes even more frequently. Finally when she started getting solids (about 7 months) it was like she was dying for it. So I've always made sure to keep nursing her as often and to offer the breastmilk first, but she's still that way. She may be wetting 6 diapers a day, but barely. I'm going to pay really close attention today.
    EmilySusan

    Answer by EmilySusan at 10:29 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

  • (Still OP). Finally, I am concerned about my daughter's weight gain. At her 6 month appt (after I had cut out all formula supplements), she dropped to the 25th percentile (she had been in around the 50th since birth. I don't think she's even gained a pound since her 6 month appt (I go in next week for 9 month appt), so I'll know for sure. WIth my first daughter, I became pregnant at 7 months, my supply dropped significantly, and I was supplementing with formula by this point... I assumed it was because I was pregnant, anyway, but now I'm wondering...

    I understand that women tend to be too quick to blame supply; but some women really do have supply issues. Anyway, I'm just trying to gather information... Thanks for all your advice.
    EmilySusan

    Answer by EmilySusan at 10:33 AM on Jun. 11, 2009

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