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IS IT OKAY TO GO TO WAR AND KILL?

Say that you are catholic (asuming catholics even go to war) and you are in war against people who are catholic but have no choice but to be in war. Do you kill them for your COUNTRY? Or does god come first. Do Christians even belive in war? (Just using Catholics as an example not pointing them out ANY Christinan denom.) Another post got me thinking....

And your thoughts?????

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 9:58 PM on Jun. 12, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Answers (20)
  • As a Christian;
    (Matt. 26:52) Then Jesus said to him: “Return your sword to its place, for all those who take the sword will perish by the sword
    “A careful review of all the information available goes to show that, until the time of Marcus Aurelius [Roman emperor from 161 to 180 C.E.], no Christian became a soldier; and no soldier, after becoming a Christian, remained in military service.”—The Rise of Christianity (London, 1947), E. W. Barnes, p. 333.
    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:06 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • “We who were filled with war, and mutual slaughter, and every wickedness, have each through the whole earth changed our warlike weapons,—our swords into ploughshares, and our spears into implements of tillage,—and we cultivate piety, righteousness, philanthropy, faith, and hope, which we have from the Father Himself through Him who was crucified.”—Justin Martyr in “Dialogue With Trypho, a Jew” (2nd century C.E.), The Ante-Nicene Fathers (Grand Rapids, Mich.; reprint of 1885 Edinburgh edition), edited by A. Roberts and J. Donaldson, Vol. I, p. 254.
    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:07 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • “They refused to take any active part in the civil administration or the military defence of the empire. . . . it was impossible that the Christians, without renouncing a more sacred duty, could assume the character of soldiers, of magistrates, or of princes.”—History of Christianity (New York, 1891), Edward Gibbon, pp. 162, 163.

    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:07 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • What scriptures have always had a bearing on the attitude of true Christians toward involvement in political issues and activities?
    John 17:16: “They are no part of the world, just as I [Jesus] am no part of the world.”
    John 6:15: “Jesus, knowing they [the Jews] were about to come and seize him to make him king, withdrew again into the mountain all alone.” Later, he told the Roman governor: “My kingdom is no part of this world. If my kingdom were part of this world, my attendants would have fought that I should not be delivered up to the Jews. But, as it is, my kingdom is not from this source.”—John 18:36.
    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:07 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • Jas. 4:4: “Adulteresses, do you not know that the friendship with the world is enmity with God? Whoever, therefore, wants to be a friend of the world is constituting himself an enemy of God.” (Why is the matter so serious? Because, as 1 John 5:19 says, “the whole world is lying in the power of the wicked one.” At John 14:30, Jesus referred to Satan as being “the ruler of the world.” So, no matter what worldly faction a person might support, under whose control would he really come?)
    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:07 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • in the bible it talks about how war is different than murder.... it's defending your country and hence, fighting for God. My husband was always curious on this before he left for Iraq and now that's he's been over there.... well, but it's really up to God and nobody can say right or wrong. I believe God knows your motives and it's either kill or be killed! Tell you what, I'd prefer my hubby kill than be killed along with his buddies and fellow military men/women!!! Otherwise our country would be overrun and it was founded on God! But thats just my opinion on this.....
    07lilmama1108

    Answer by 07lilmama1108 at 10:07 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • Do such patriotic symbols and ceremonies really have religious significance?
    “[Historian] Carlton Hayes pointed out long ago that the ritual of flag-worship and oath-taking in an American school is a religious observance. . . . And that these daily rituals are religious has been at last affirmed by the Supreme Court in a series of cases.”—The American Character (New York, 1956), D. W. Brogan, pp. 163, 164.
    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:07 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • “Early flags were almost purely of a religious character. . . . The national banner of England for centuries—the red cross of St. George—was a religious one; in fact the aid of religion seems ever to have been sought to give sanctity to national flags, and the origin of many can be traced to a sacred banner.”—Encyclopædia Britannica (1946), Vol. 9, p. 343.
    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:08 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • “In a public ceremony presided over by the vice president of the [Military Supreme] Court, on the 19th of November, honors were shown to the Brazilian flag. . . . After the flag was hoisted, Minister General of the Army Tristao de Alencar Araripe expressed himself concerning the commemoration in this manner: ‘ . . . flags have become a divinity of patriotic religion which imposes worship . . . The flag is venerated and worshiped . . . The flag is worshiped, just as the Fatherland is worshiped.’”—Diario da Justiça (Federal Capital, Brazil), February 16, 1956, p. 1906.

    BabayBella

    Answer by BabayBella at 10:08 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

  • I personally don't believe it's the Christian thing to do. I support our troops coming home safely, but I don't support the war itself. I believe that if I put my faith in my Creator, he will see me through hard times. I have the hope that I will live forever in a perfect world when all is said and done. I'm not judging those who do support the war and the troop's efforts. I understand the thinking that without war, we would not be a "free nation", but I still hold firm to my beliefs. I choose to obey God first.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:10 PM on Jun. 12, 2009

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