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Is AA just for those who believe in God?

How do you get past the first steps if you dont believe in a higher power?

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 11:19 AM on Jun. 17, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Answers (14)
  • We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
    *Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
    Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
    Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
    Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
    Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
    Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
    Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
    Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
    Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
    Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowl
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:28 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • Those are the original steps...it was in response to a person who just deleted her response.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:29 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • You can be an Atheist and do 12 step, you have to come up with a personal way to conceptualize your "Higher Power", such as viewing it as your Inner Potential or Higher Self. Also, find others in 12 step who  are Atheist or Agnostic to gain some insight, support, and perspective. Defining your own Higher Power will make a big difference. Don't let the Higher Power stuff deter you, twelve step works for many people, & they say you should go to at least 8 meetings (I think) before giving up. I know some people are very into GOD as the Higher Power, especially the God of the Bible but, don't let that stumble your progress, they are doing what works for them you need to do what works for you. Good Luck!

    BubbaLuva

    Answer by BubbaLuva at 11:30 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • No, not at all. Its for anyone who wants help.
    They do discuss belief in a higher power, but that higher power can be anything - you can make anything your higher power.
    Belief in God is not a requirement for membership. The only requirement for membership is the requirement to stop drinking.
    (taken from the essentials of philosophy by james mannion)
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 11:31 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • The Atheist/Agnostic 12 Steps

    1. We admitted that we were using alcohol/drugs in spite of better judgment, and that it was destroying many aspects of, if not all aspects of our lives and causing harm to ourselves and those around us.
    2. Came to realize that we truly needed the support of others that could truly relate to us, what our chemical abuse had done to us and those around us, and could help steer us back on track when our thinking and behavior got destructive. In short, that we can not find all of the answers alone.
    3. Made a decision to turn my will and my life into the right direction, despite my desire to overindulge myself. I realized that I am much more fulfilled as a person when I am truly there to take care of myself and others; and that this is impossible when actively drinking/using.
    4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
    5. Admitted to ourselves the exact nature of our wrongs.
    BubbaLuva

    Answer by BubbaLuva at 11:34 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • ^^^That is just one version you can search online for others :)

    BubbaLuva

    Answer by BubbaLuva at 11:35 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • 5. Admitted to ourselves the exact nature of our wrongs. When appropriate, asked the opinions of others and were willing to take those opinions into consideration, whether they were what we wanted to hear or not.
    6. Were entirely ready to make a plan of action to stop these behaviors that were harmful to us and others.
    7. Let go of resentments, or at least became willing to try. Started to acknowledge that many of our resentments really came down to our defects, not those of others.
    8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
    9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
    BubbaLuva

    Answer by BubbaLuva at 11:36 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • 10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
    11. Made a genuine effort to maintain a positive attitude, practice patience and understanding of others, and remain honest with ourselves when tracing the root of our troubles. Continued to think for ourselves and not be easily led, but seriously considered the input of others.
    12. Having a much stronger sense of self-worth and purpose as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.
    BubbaLuva

    Answer by BubbaLuva at 11:36 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • Yes i deleted my response because i misunderstood the question....
    Aasiyah

    Answer by Aasiyah at 11:37 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

  • thank you BubbaLuva, that is what I was wondering. I am Christian and my walk with God is what got me through all this. I was just wondering how one who does not believe in God would find a way to get through these steps.

    In fact, a week ago marked the 15th year! Praise the Lord!

    Raise our apple juice glasses to another 15 years.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:37 AM on Jun. 17, 2009

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