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All the missing and/or omitted Bible books

Fist question, is there anyone not aware that are books not in the Canon that were up for consideration but after various councils they were not included in the final Bible?
This works much like a movie, there are various scenes that are cut and sometimes entire characters are cut before the final movie is released.
Second question, these writings, like Thomas and Mary are they around? Can we read them? It seems like they are still there and we can still read them so why get hot and bothered over the fact they aren't in the Bible?

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 3:27 PM on Jul. 2, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Answers (13)
  • Yes, you can find them in the Gnostic Bible:

    http://www.gnosis.org/naghamm/nhl.html

    http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/gnostics.html

    You can also look up "gnostic bible" on amazon and get a few hits.
    jennijune_21

    Answer by jennijune_21 at 3:35 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • I assume that is yes they are still around. This would mean the councils didn't destroy them and there is no reason to go bananas because they aren't in the Bible.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:41 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • Second question, these writings, like Thomas and Mary are they around? Can we read them?
    Yes, many of them are still readable, but some have not been published for a wider audience, making them difficult to access.

    It seems like they are still there and we can still read them so why get hot and bothered over the fact they aren't in the Bible?
    I assume because since they weren't included they are considered not accurate, not valid or not the word of God. If "you" believe them to be valid, than having them ignored based on a roundtable debate from the 2nd century is probably pretty irritating.
    nysa00

    Answer by nysa00 at 3:45 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • why though? Why would it matter that a round table put together a set of books if you can read them? I just don't understand why it has to be a big deal? If a person believes in these books the person would not believe in solo scripture(FTR I don't believe in solo scripture) and therefore still has access to the books and can read them. I don't understand the purpose of getting mad or irritated about something that happened in the 2nd century. (Actually I think it was the 4th but I would have to verify that)
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:50 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • is there anyone not aware that are books not in the Canon that were up for consideration but after various councils they were not included in the final Bible? I don't think so...


    these writings, like Thomas and Mary are they around? Can we read them? Yes, I have copies of both. I honestly prefer Thomas to Mary but they are both great to read through...
    SabrinaMBowen

    Answer by SabrinaMBowen at 3:51 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • Like nysa00 said... they were not included because they didn't line up with the other accounts. And just because some texts were left out, doesn't mean the Bible isn't accurate.

    For example... we know that planes leave trails behind them in the sky, because of the exhaust and vapor from the engines. But there are people out there who swear that these are "chemtrails" designed by the "world elite" to slowly poison us so they can have world domination. Now, if you were putting together a book of facts about airplaines, and in the chapter explaning the trails...would you include the testimony of those nutcases? Probably not.
    brandyj

    Answer by brandyj at 4:07 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • Well as a non-Christian I can't really say why in this particular case. However, as a historian I hate when incomplete information is printed, because I know that people will read it & get the wrong idea. As a result of selective inclusion, many people don't really understand certain important parts of history, for example WWII & the Age of Exploration. I find it very irritating when people are purposely misled because of ulterior motives, regardless of when the misleading information was released.


    PS - it might be fourth century, for some reason I have 326 CE in mind as the date, but I do get things mixed up pretty regularly so that could be the date for something else.

    nysa00

    Answer by nysa00 at 4:07 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • Likewise, just because someone writes something about Jesus Christ.. that doesn't make it true. It must be compared to the rest of God's word.
    brandyj

    Answer by brandyj at 4:09 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • Yes, I'm aware, and yes the Gnostic gospels are still out there, both in print form and online. Personally I like the Gospel of Thomas.
    Freela

    Answer by Freela at 4:46 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

  • Well there were a lot of ancient texts and not all of them are inspired. The Gnositcs gospels were never really considered inspired by the Early Church Fathers - they were pretty much condemend as heresy by them. However there were writings like the Letters of Clement, the Shepherd of Hermes, the Apocalypse of Peter the Didache (aka Teachings of the Apostles) that some thought should be included. There's a website "Early Christian Writings" that have them. A timeline of the NT Canon is here (from a Catholic website).

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 6:02 PM on Jul. 2, 2009

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