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Forcing our ways on other countries...

Um are we doing that? How so? I am really interested in the ways in which people believe this is taking place... We we talking privately funded aid groups? Our military?

Some people do things differently, no doubt. But for example, in Iraq, how are we forcing our ways on them? By promoting democracy and ending genocide? Or by helping them rebuild their infrastructure that Saddam destroyed? What of our ways are we forcing?

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 2:22 PM on Jul. 12, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Answers (16)
  • Some people do things differently, no doubt. But for example, in Iraq, how are we forcing our ways on them? By promoting democracy and ending genocide? Or by helping them rebuild their infrastructure that Saddam destroyed? What of our ways are we forcing?


    Sadaam didn't destroy their infrastructure, we did. He was a dictator and if teh people wanted a change they should have revolted. They never asked for democracy, just because thats the American way, doesn't make it right for everyone. How would YOU feel in China invaded America to "spread" communism?

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 3:15 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • Sadaam didn't destroy their infrastructure, we did. He was a dictator and if teh people wanted a change they should have revolted. They never asked for democracy, just because thats the American way, doesn't make it right for everyone. How would YOU feel in China invaded America to "spread" communism?

    Iraq was in a mess infastructure wise BEFORE we went in from years of wars and saddams neglect.
    Carpy

    Answer by Carpy at 3:24 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • Iraq was in a mess infastructure wise BEFORE we went in from years of wars and saddams neglect.

    and no where near as bad as it is now
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 3:31 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • For some countries, the idea of just standing up and saying no doesn't always go through the minds of it's civilians. You are talking about a place that has endured generation after generation of oppression and neglect. The people there knew that saying no could mean genocide.


    By removing that tyrant that country now has an opportunity to rebuild itself and flourish.  Most things generally get worse before they get better and they are on the right tract towards their own independence.

    etsmom

    Answer by etsmom at 3:59 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • no where near as bad as it is now sweetakins? LMAO! I received pictures from my husband's command showing the work they were doing to rebuild and help them get simple "commodities" that we take for granted back- like running water... And that was in 05... since then there has been less violence- which has allowed our troops to work more quickly on the rebuild. It's not worse now... and such an assumption is pretty ignorant.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:12 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • Also we did not invade to spread democracy. We invaded because we had credible intelligence that they were harboring WMD. Which you might agree with if you look at your own beliefs on what weapons you are comfortable with your neighbor having. We did believe the intelligence as we did Brittan's who said the same thing. We invaded because Saddam refused to follow his agreements and have inspectors verify that our intelligence was incorrect.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:18 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • Three years after the fall of Saddam, many Iraqis still lack basic amenities like potable water, regularly endure power outages, and have yet to fully benefit from their country's immense oil wealth. "Efforts to rebuild Iraq are failing," says Representative Henry Waxman (D-CA), a leading Democratic critic of Bush administration reconstruction efforts. "We've spent $2 billion and the situation is worse than when we arrived." With triple-digit temperatures fast approaching, "the amount of electricity has to improve for people to survive," said Iraqi Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari in a June 16 CFR meeting. Although security remains Iraqis' foremost concern, one out of every three Iraqis say restoring infrastructure—not job creation, amending the constitution, or expelling U.S. troops—should be the government's top priority, according to a March 2006 International Republican Institute poll.
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 4:21 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • http://www.cfr.org/publication/10971/iraqs_faltering_infrastructure.html
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 4:21 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • How is the quality of life for average Iraqis?
    Iraq's human development indicators are among the lowest in the Middle East, according to the World Bank. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, Iraq led the Middle East in development of infrastructure, social services, and health care. Yet after years of successive wars and sanctions, many Iraqis today do not have access to basic staples like potable water and electricity. A shortage of hospitals and health-care facilities has added to their hardships. Current health statistics on Iraq are difficult to find, but a UNICEF report said Iraq's mortality rate for children under five rose from 5 percent in 1990 to 12.5 percent in 2004.
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 4:21 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

  • When you all say "we", does that imply that you all were in Iraq during the initial phase of the invasion? I know I was not there so I cannot use it in that context. I am sure most of you were not in the military..So there's no "we". There's the US military maybe, but not a "we" unless you were there.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:29 PM on Jul. 12, 2009

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