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Swine flu still in the news

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,533591,00.html?test=latestnews

In the U.S., the H1N1 virus has sickened tens of thousands and closed summer camps at a time when there should be little or no flu activity.

Even as the WHO and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to raise awareness of this potentially deadly disease, which appears to be killing both sick and healthy individuals, the topic has virtually disappeared from the headlines.

“Complacency is a major concern,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director for National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the CDC.

“This virus is a new one, and on top of that, we really still don’t know how it’s going to behave,” Schuchat said during a media conference call Friday. “There are special efforts that have been undertaken by health agencies, but individuals also need to be ready, to be thinking ahead and have steps

 
AprilDJC

Asked by AprilDJC at 7:49 PM on Jul. 17, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 20 (8,524 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (9)
  • The flu virus of 1918 actually did little damage the first round. Most of the deaths occurred in 1919 when it came back with a vengence. We have a cemetary right beside the school here in town that is full of nothing but kids who died in that epeidemic. All of them died in the second round in 1919.
    Carpy

    Answer by Carpy at 9:04 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • in place should a family member get sick or a workplace close down or a situation arise that requires working from home.

    Over the next six to 12 weeks, there are several concerns that national health officials are preparing for:

    1. Figuring out how the virus will react and spread once students return to schools, especially inner city schools, which typically struggle with overcrowding issues.

    2. Overseeing the completion of a vaccine and getting it to the individuals who need it most.

    3. Determining how the virus will behave as it spreads and mutates.

    Worried?
    AprilDJC

    Answer by AprilDJC at 7:50 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • Nope. It's current death rate is still lower than regular flu. It may mutate into something stronger, or it may mutate into something weaker. I'm still more at risk of dying in a car accident on the way to the hospital than I am dying from swine flu.
    mancosmomma

    Answer by mancosmomma at 8:00 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • a couple people just died here last week....
    hypermamaz

    Answer by hypermamaz at 8:18 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • You know what the media is.....big fuss today and gone tomorrow .....and Michael Jackson drove everything else off the screen anyway.

    But you are right to be concerned as it is still spreading across the globe and the WHO was right to declare it a pandemic because of the ease of transmisission, even though the death reate has been mercifully low so far . But the coming winter and spring could be a challenge as many viruses can mutate very quickly.

    Not all the media ignore it. I believe the BBC websites give continuing coverage and links to other information sites. Try them . I will, thanks to your question. CNN is another possible source of info even though it is scarcely mentioned in their newscasts.
    janet116

    Answer by janet116 at 9:25 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • 29 people have died here in the UK.

    Around 27 of those had serious underlying conditions. The swine flu simply added to it not even giving them a fighting chance. Very sad.
    GrungeMum

    Answer by GrungeMum at 9:35 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • 263 deaths in the United States so far (the newest number I can find). Can you imagine what it will do when flu season hits? Holy cowcrap batman.
    * Alabama - 477
    * Alaska - 218
    * Arizona - 762 cases - 11 Deaths
    * Arkansas - 47
    * California - 3,161 - 52 Deaths
    * Colorado - 155
    * Connecticut - 1,581 - 7 Deaths
    * Deleware - 364
    * Florida - 2,188 - 12 Deaths
    * Georgia - 174 - 1 Death
    * Hawaii - 722 - 1 Death
    * Idaho - 143
    * Illinois - 3,357 - 15 Deaths
    * Indiana - 282 - 1 Death
    * Iowa - 165
    * Kansas - 186
    * Kentucky - 143
    * Louisiana - 232
    * Maine - 133
    * Maryland - 732 - 3 Deaths
    * Massachusetts - 1,343 - 5 Deaths
    * Michigan - 515 cases - 8 Deaths
    * Minnesota - 660 - 3 Deaths
    * Mississippi - 219
    * Missouri - 70 cases - 1 Death
    ColleenF30

    Answer by ColleenF30 at 11:13 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • # New Jersey - 1,350 - 14 Deaths
    # New Mexico - 232
    # New York - 2,670 cases - 57 Deaths
    # North Carolina - 395 - 4 Deaths
    # North Dakota - 61
    # Ohio - 161 - 1 Death
    # Oklahoma - 176 - 1 Death
    # Oregon - 465 - 5 Deaths
    # Pennsylvania - 1,914 - 8 Deaths
    # Rhode Island - 188 - 2 Deaths
    # South Carolina - 244
    # South Dakota - 39
    # Tennessee - 247 - 1 Death
    # Texas - 4,975 cases - 24 Deaths
    # Utah - 966 cases - 14 Deaths
    # Vermont - 59
    # Virginia - 319 cases - 2 Deaths
    # Washington - 636 cases - 4 Deaths
    # Washington, DC - 45
    # West Virginia - 227
    # Wisconsin - 6,031 - 5 Deaths
    # Wyoming - 106
    # American Samoa - 8
    # Guam - 1
    # Puerto Rico - 18
    # Virgin Islands - 44

    Those are the cases and deaths for the USA
    ColleenF30

    Answer by ColleenF30 at 11:13 PM on Jul. 17, 2009

  • There is a substance used during the time of the Black Plague that protected people from virus, bacteria, mold, and fungus. It works and it cost less than one co pay. This recipe and free information can be found here:

    http://www.aromanotes.com/karen/ 
    Karen_

    Answer by Karen_ at 1:24 AM on Jul. 18, 2009