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Should people with incurable diseases be denied coverage?

The brother of Obama chief adviser Rahm Emanuel, Ezekiel Emanuel, is the mastermind behind the healthcare legislation. He has written that people with incurable illnesses should not be guaranteed health care. One of the obvious examples he gave is that, "people with dementia" should not be guaranteed care. That would be people with Alzheimer's Disease.

http://www.freedomslighthouse.com/2009/07/health-care-advocate-says-obama-claim.html

What do you think?

This already happens with certain private plans. They deny treatment to cancer patients they think will die anyways, and some plans do not cover certain autism treatments because they believe there is no cure.

But should people who have no other choice for insurance go without treatment if the gov't plan thinks they are not worth it?

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 3:53 PM on Jul. 20, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

This question is closed.
Answers (12)
  • Health care is not going to be free to anybody. We will have to pay for it no matter what the people pushing the pencils say. It is not possible to have a country with no money and then give away a trillion dollars in health care to its people.
    As for have an incurable disease. That is different then a pre-existing one. Incurable means you will die. Pre-existing could mean anything from arthritis to high blood pressure.
    The ones that most need healthcare are the very ones that are going to have to go without. Aren't the ones fighting for their lives just as important as the ones who are not? I surely think so.

    And, last time I looked, people with medicare pay a premium every month, comes right out of their Social Security check unless they fall under the guidlines for the state in which they live to pick it up. Not everyone is eligible for that.
    foreverb3

    Answer by foreverb3 at 5:17 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • I think the point of that was they can not tell an insurance company what they are to and not to cover. some people dont pay for plans like that and insurance just simply wont cover it. Best way to prevent that is to actually do research before you chose any insurance company and make sure they cover what u are at risk for.
    Dom123123

    Answer by Dom123123 at 3:57 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • MOST insurance companies will not cover preexisting conditions unless you are in a group, then they have no choice. I am thinking that the governments healthcare will likely have some rules and stipulations on it but how far they will go in limiting people? I really dont know. What they will do and whats RIGHT are likely two different things. My mothers MIL has severe dementia and I know if she didnt have medicare coverage....it would be bad.
    momofsaee

    Answer by momofsaee at 4:00 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • How about children diagnosed with diabetes? Or a hundred other types of cases. This is just horrid. I hope the people who are writing these terrible things are stricken with incurable, painful diseases themselves or a close family member, so they can see what they are doing and how it affects real peopple. The financial bottom line isn't the only consideration when you start messing with medical care.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:05 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • "I hope the people who are writing these terrible things are stricken with incurable, painful diseases themselves or a close family member, so they can see what they are doing and how it affects real peopple."

    The people who are writing these things won't ever have to worry about the cost of treatment. They can afford to go to any doctor they want and pay cash. THAT is why they don't care.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:10 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • wow anon :05 thats going to be some really bad karma. thats awful to wish an incurable disease on someone. really petty as well.

    All children are legally allowed free health care coverage in america until the age of 20. no matter what they do or do not have. if they are physically disabled you have free health coverage for life. if you are over 65 u have free. if u are pregnant free. and so much more. I also think if you are a care provider to someone who is diabled u are also free.

    Most people dont know that and dont know where to look but that has been implimited for a long time now. and those are all government funded. But as far as private insurance compaines. most poeple pay for years for coverage. its pre-existing conditions that get denied because the private company will then have a loss of money. if u already have insurance u will be covered, they have no choice unless u dont pay ur premiums of cors
    Dom123123

    Answer by Dom123123 at 4:11 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • I am sorry but I have to agree with Anon 3:05. I am so sick and tired of inconsiderate people when it comes to my health. So many people do not have these issues they think it is a lost cause...but if it was their family member they would not feel the same.
    Brickhouse95

    Answer by Brickhouse95 at 4:25 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • My BIL is selling everything that's not nailed down from his shop - he's the owner - to pay for the outrageous COBRA benefits that are keeping my SIL's chemo going. The chemo is a long shot but she is hanging in there. The idea that some bureaucrat could cut that treatment off because she doesn't stack up on a spreadsheet is nothing short of murder.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:44 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • NO
    tyme4me2day

    Answer by tyme4me2day at 4:45 PM on Jul. 20, 2009

  • My grandmother has dementia as well.She spent the best part of her life taking care of others.She was an in home caretaker for alot of different elderly people.She was there through the good and bad and by their side when any passed away.If I was told that she needed to just lay down and die because she is a burden on the govy...HELL WOULD BREAK LOOSE.
    tnmomofive

    Answer by tnmomofive at 4:48 PM on Jul. 20, 2009