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Is this really true about bf'ing?

Someone told me that if you don't eat enough as a bf'er, your child will not get enough calories from your milk. Is that true? A lactation consultant told me it's really a myth that we need to eat more calories and I should just eat when I'm hungry. The milk is there and my baby is gaining weight fine, so why would I need to eat more? It doesn't make sense to me. This person told me that if I eat more calories, my milk will have more calories and my baby will stay full longer. Seems fishy to me.

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 4:38 PM on Jul. 22, 2009 in Babies (0-12 months)

Answers (11)
  • As long as your baby is gaining weight and growing then you are fine. You don't need to purposely eat more then what you feel comfortable eating but you should just make sure you are eating a well rounded, nutritious diet and staying hydrated.
    psugal

    Answer by psugal at 4:43 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • You only have to add 500 calories to your diet on a daily basis. Those calories shouldn't be made up of junk as they have no nutrients.
    Jademom07

    Answer by Jademom07 at 4:46 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • I don't think that's true. I believe you are expending more energy and therefor have to eat a bit more (2-300 calories) but you really need to keep up on your water intake.

    Think of it this way... if you didn't consume anything more than a normal day, your body would use your stores as fuel for milk, and you'll probably lose weight. But milk out of your body is milk out of your body.... it's the same caloric value if you're pumping an ounce vs. a cup.

    I'd be more concerned over the quantity, not the calories.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:47 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • Just like in pregnancy, your infant and his milk get first dibs at your nutrition. Meaning you will become deficient before your milk or your child. It's important to take vitamins and eat more for your benefit than your child's, but keep in mind that if you are lacking in something your milk will lack it as well. It's my understanding that nursing women need like 400 or 500 extra calories a day, it's really not that much.
    jellyphish

    Answer by jellyphish at 4:48 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • Just keep eating healthy - eat when you are hungry. As long as your baby is gaining weight and is healthy - I would listen to the lactation consultant.
    RutterMama

    Answer by RutterMama at 4:55 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • You're using food for your energy and to make food for baby, so of course you need to eat a bit more and be healthy about it. Your baby will be fed first, so your body will take all it needs from you to make the milk then it will use what it can so you will suffer before the baby does. So chances are, if you aren't eating enough, you'll know it! :)
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 5:01 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • Myth myth myth.

    Eat to your hunger, drink to your thirst. Baby will still be the same no matter what you eat or drink, unless he has a reaction to something in your diet.

    This person gave you bad info.
    gdiamante

    Answer by gdiamante at 5:35 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • its not that baby would lose out, its that YOU would.

    milk production takes a lot out of the body.

    you really need to keep up the hydration.
    hypermamaz

    Answer by hypermamaz at 5:58 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • No, if you eat more calories, they go to your thighs, not your milk. *sigh* So sad, I know.
    apexmommy

    Answer by apexmommy at 6:57 PM on Jul. 22, 2009

  • Your body will NEVER short your baby. You will be the one shorted if anyone was. Our bodies are built to take care of out babies first.
    aehanrahan

    Answer by aehanrahan at 2:38 AM on Jul. 23, 2009

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