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Questions for Catholics



Does the RCC teach that Mary is a mediatrix, benefactress, and advocate?

Does the RCC call the pope "Lord God" or "Holy Father"?

Does the RCC insist that their priests remain celebate and not marry?

Does the RCC teach that when its priests break the communion bread, this is an actual reenactment of the very Sacrifice of Jesus Christ?

Does the RCC consider itself a modern-day prophet? I mean, does it believe that it alone receives the truth of Christ for all Christianity?

Does the RCC teach that it's necessary to belong to the RCC in order to obtain salvation? Can members of protestant denominations be saved without converting to Catholicism?

How does the RCC view Protestants?

 
Lexylex

Asked by Lexylex at 10:05 PM on Jul. 25, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 13 (1,145 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (43)
  • Dogmas,Doctrines, whatever...


    Lexy there is a difference and if you're going to try to claim Catholic teachings are wrong you need to understand the difference.


    Salvation is through CHRIST ALONE, not a religious institution, nor Sacraments,


    Absolutely!  Christ is our one and only Savior.  If you think the Catholic Church doesn't teach then that it demonstrates again your lack of understanding about the Catholic faith.  The CC Church and the Sacraments are gifts to us from Jesus as a way we can experience Christ's saving grace.  Just belonging to the Church go going through the motions of the sacrmaents doesn't save us.  We can't earn our way into haven - we're saved only because of God's grace.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 9:48 PM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Does the RCC teach that Mary is a mediatrix, benefactress, and advocate?


    That is not a defined dogma of the Catholic Church, but we believe that as Paul says that we are all "co-worker with Christ" (1 Cor. 3:9).  So in a sense it's possible for humans to work through Christ in the work of redemption.  That's what we do in part when we spead the Good News.


    See "Mary, Mother of Salvation" and "Does "Co-redemptrix" or "Mediatrix" mean "Co-Savior"?"

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:14 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • Does the RCC call the pope "Lord God" or "Holy Father"?


    We do not call the popel "Lord God" - there is only one God.  We do use the term "Holy Father" for the pope as a mark of respect because we recognize the pope's call by Christ to image the holiness and Fatherhood of God. The term draws its power from, is dependent upon, and shares in a subordinate manner in the holy Fatherhood of God; it in no way supercedes it or denies the unique holiness and paternity of God alone.  We do not believe the pope is equal to Jesus.  (See previous Q&A)

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:17 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • Does the RCC insist that their priests remain celebate and not marry?


    If a man CHOOSES to become a priest and is not married, then he takes a vow of celibacy promising to remain unmarried.  Just like if a man gets married to a woman he basically makes a vow of monogomy.  This is the mans free choice - no one makes him take it.   For Eastern Rite Catholics (and in rare occassions Latin Rite) it's possible for a married man to become a priest.  If a man becomes a priest but later decides he should be married, he can petition to be released from the vow of celibacy and get married - in the church even.  However, he is laicized - meaning he is relieved of the responsiblities of the priesthood.  This is more because of our understanding of the sacraments of marriage and Holy Orders (priesthood) than thinking the priest did something wrong.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:21 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • Does the RCC teach that when its priests break the communion bread, this is an actual reenactment of the very Sacrifice of Jesus Christ?


    No.  It is not a reinactment at all.  But we do believe that the sacrifice of the Mass is the same sacrifice that Christ made on Calvery passed on through time and space.  Christ's sacrifice wasn't a one-time event -- it goes beyond space and time and applies to all.  At the Mass we are experiencing the perpetual nature of Christ's sacrifice for our sins.   See "Is the Mass a True Sacrifice?"

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:27 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • Does the RCC consider itself a modern-day prophet? I mean, does it believe that it alone receives the truth of Christ for all Christianity?


     Not sure what you mean by "prophet" but I would think no.  The CC doesn't believe in continuing revelations, we don't think God reveals new teachings to the pope, or anything like that. 

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:31 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • Does the RCC teach that it's necessary to belong to the RCC in order to obtain salvation?


    The CC does NOT teach that one must formally be a member of the Catholic Church to be saved.  The teaching is "extra ecclesiam, nulla salus,"  or outside the church, no salvation which means salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is His Body.  That we as the Body of Christ do God's will and bring others to Christ through whom salvation is possible.   See "No Salvation Outside the Church" for more information.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:41 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • Can members of protestant denominations be saved without converting to Catholicism?


    It's possible, but they'd have more certainty if they followed Catholic teachings and received the sacraments.  The CC acknowledges that many truths are found in other ecclesial communities, the complete fullness of Christ’s teaching and grace is only found in the Catholic Church.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:44 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • How does the RCC view Protestants?


    The usual term is they are our 'separated brethern'.  The CC recognizes the baptism of Protestant faiths as valid.  As the Catechism says: Those "who believe in Christ and have been properly baptized are put in a certain, although imperfect, communion with the Catholic Church".  The CC believes that we should work toward unity with other faiths, especially other Christian faiths.  (See "A Bus Ride Into the Catholic Church".)

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 10:48 PM on Jul. 25, 2009

  • While Erin is very good at actual facts, and is always correct, and I always learn something from her (I'm Catholic but I wasn't raised strictly in doctrine because my parents dont attend church regularly), I'm going to force some opinion on at least one of your questions. I honestly can't see why someone wouldn't be saved as long as they believed in Christ and have been baptised, no matter their religion. Every religion believes they're the "right one" and of course they want others to convert. One of the reasons I stay in the Catholic faith and grow deeper into it each day, is because I do believe the most precious part of the faith is the offering of the body and blood. I also like the "strict teachings" or rules of the CC because I believe we SHOULD be strict about entering God's house and how we live our lives. It is God we are talking about here. If I met him in person and I was wearing jeans, I'd feel underdressed!
    mumma28

    Answer by mumma28 at 11:53 PM on Jul. 25, 2009