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Would anyone like to explain the difference between Catholic Dogma, Doctrine and just beliefs?

Does anyone know when (if ever) they are infalible? Which ones can be changes? What parts of the Catholic Church are not required?

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drink-lover

Asked by drink-lover at 9:55 AM on Jul. 26, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

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Answers (15)
  • Growing up catholic I have to say no catholic is perfect.(i believe that is what infalible means LOL i still haven't had my coffee yet) Alot of Catholic teachings are based on man made laws. No meat on friday, birth control, and my favorite confession. Nowhere in the bible does it say you have to confess to a man...it says you take your transgressions to God and ask God for forgiveness. Nowhere does it say you play a game of chinese telephone in that darkened booth(which is quite scary for a second-grader to enter as i speak from experience).

    Also they pray to saints, which in the bible clearly states that there will be "no other gods beside me".....so what are they doing praying to saints? and the virgin mary?

    There were so many inconsistencies I fled the flock a long time ago.
    CinderAmethyst

    Answer by CinderAmethyst at 10:46 AM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:09 AM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Prayers of the Saints :  More Biblical Support 


    The ancient practice of asking the Saints in heaven to pray with us and for us goes back to the early church.  The Bible shows that they are in heaven interceding on our behalf and taking our prayers up to God. 

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:37 AM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Take a trip to a local Catholic Church to see about the modern day confessional booth and the light in them.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:39 AM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:44 AM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • CinderAmethyst, that wasn't at all what I asked but thanks for the leasson on why you think the Catholic Church is wrong.
    drink-lover

    Answer by drink-lover at 3:55 PM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Doctrine is all the Church teaching in matters of faith and morals. Dogma is that part of doctrine which has been divinely revealed and which the Church has formally defined and declared to be believed as revealed. So all dogma is doctrine, but not all doctrine is dogma.


    All that the Church teaches in the area of faith and morals is infallible to the extent to which it has been defined - so both doctrine and dogma can be infallible.  This article explains it more.


    Since dogmas are divinely revealled they do not change. Doctrine doesn't "change" but over time it can develop as we come to better understand it.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 4:19 PM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • "What parts of the Catholic Church are not required?"

    Not sure what this is asking. The Catholic Church does have disciplines - which are basically ways in which we put doctrines/dogma into practice. These can and do change. There is also cannon law which applies to Catholics and all Catholics have to follow (but people of other faiths don't have to). For example, there are canon laws concerning what makes a valid Catholic marriage that Catholics have to follow - but the Catholic church recognizes marriages of non-Catholics as valid even if they don't follow those laws.
    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 4:21 PM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Growing up catholic I have to say no catholic is perfect.(i believe that is what infalible means LOL i still haven't had my coffee yet) .


    Coffee is such a helpful thing!  :-).  No, infallible doesn't mean perfect.  Infallible means unable to teach error.  The pope as an individual is NOT infallible/perfect/without error/sinless/whatever.  What the CC is saying with the doctrine of infallibly is that Christ is protecting His flock by giving the Pope (and the Magisterium) the ability to say the right things when making official statements about faith and morals. The Church claims that these proclamations are "infallible," not that Church leaders are "indefectible."

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 4:25 PM on Jul. 26, 2009

  • Alot of Catholic teachings are based on man made laws. No meat on friday, birth control, and my favorite confession.


    Catholics don't think so - and you've mixed up doctrines/dogmas/and disciplines.  No meat on Friday is a discipline - it's a way of practicing our belief that we need to prepare ourselves to receive the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist on Sunday.  We don't think it's been divinely revealled that it's bad to at meat.  Birth Control is a doctrine - the Church has always taught that contraception is wrong (all Christian denominations taught that unil around 1930 - guess others thought God must have changed His mind).  Confession as a sacrament is a dogma - Jesus has revealled to us that we should experience God's forgiveness through the sacrament of Confession.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 4:30 PM on Jul. 26, 2009

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