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No nut products allowed in school?

Would you be okay if your child's kindergarten or elementary school said that there were not nuts allowed in the school because of one child who is allergic. Would it be an inconvenience to you? What do you think.

No PB&J sandwiches, not Chex mix NONE OF THAT!!

What do you think?

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 4:12 PM on Jul. 30, 2009 in General Parenting

This question is closed.
Answers (75)
  • It would be an annoyance, but if it saves the life of a child, I'd deal with it.
    Some PP's have said "Teach your child to know their allergy and how to deal with it." What Kindergarten kid (5 or 6 years old) can RELIABLY be counted on to remember an allergy, reactions, and the steps to take to prevent a reaction or deal with a reaction?
    Would you be so callous if it were YOUR child's health at risk?
    debra_benge

    Answer by debra_benge at 6:15 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • As far as I know, that is actually an enforced rule in all schools in England...
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:14 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • I would be fine with it. Nut allergies can be deadly.
    Ginger0104

    Answer by Ginger0104 at 4:15 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • I wouldn't care. It wouldn't affect us.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:16 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • Hmmm, inconvenience on my part versus deadly reaction on someone else's part...yeah, I'd deal with it.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:24 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • No, I would not be ok with it. Every child should know what their allergies are and be taught to avoid a reaction or know how to help themselves, ie epipen. If they're so allergic that they could die from inhaling it, they shouldn't be in a public place.

    Why does 96% of the population have to cowtow to 4%? I would adhere to the no PB&J sandwich rule, but I won't go out of my way to read a label. For starters, I wouldn't even know what I was supposed to look for.

    Once we take in every conceivable allergy, where will we be? Cowtowing to less than 10% of the population. If your child is allergic, it's your responsibility to teach them to deal with it. Why does a personal problem have to end up being a community problem?

    Again, if your child could DIE... why aren't they at home with you in a safe room? I understand the right to an education and all that, cont...
    LolaCherryCola

    Answer by LolaCherryCola at 4:24 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • but this is your kids' life. Do you really want to bet it on other people reading labels properly?

    LolaCherryCola

    Answer by LolaCherryCola at 4:25 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • Taking away the right of many to eat PB&J because of the few who can't is just the beginning.

    What's next?

    Telling parents they can't dress their kids in name brands because it hurts the feelings of the kids whose parents can't afford to?

    Taking away outside play because some kids are allergic to sunlight exposure?

    Is this the Land of the Free or not??
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:32 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • For instance, in my area I'll give a conservative number that 30% of the parents are Spanish speaking. (not saying anything good or bad about that fact, just stating that's the area where I live) Do I really want to bet my child's life that 30% of the parents can't read a label, much less the school handbook. Also take into consideration that of the 70% of English parents, how many are going to read the handbook much less a label. Then how many are actually going to abide by those rules. I'd be looking at sending my child to a death squad if I had to rely on all those other parents to care as much about my child as I do.

    So again I say: if it's a mild allergy, teach them to eat only the food they bring. If it's airborne, keep them at home. I care enough about my child to do that, why don't parents who have kids with allergies like that care about their own children that much?
    LolaCherryCola

    Answer by LolaCherryCola at 4:32 PM on Jul. 30, 2009

  • Taking away the right of many to eat PB&J because of the few who can't is just the beginning.

    What's next?

    Telling parents they can't dress their kids in name brands because it hurts the feelings of the kids whose parents can't afford to?

    This is hardly a reasonable comparison at all. Grow up.
    BridgetC140

    Answer by BridgetC140 at 4:37 PM on Jul. 30, 2009