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What's your story?

My best friend and I do not share the same views on religon, but have a great respect for each other and we love to hear each others opinion on faith. The other day we had a really neat conversation about our beliefs, the history of them, did we think our childhood played a part in them and was their any significant event or time that made us question the ideas we were raised with and then decide on our own to go another route.

If you would like to tell you're story in a non hateful way, please do!

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sarahbrown1220

Asked by sarahbrown1220 at 1:40 PM on Aug. 11, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 2 (10 Credits)
Answers (25)
  • I was raised Episcopalian. I can remember the exact moment I stopped believing; my parents had a habit of dropping my sister & me off at church while they would go to breakfast. They wanted us to have a strong belief in god, yet they didn't lead by example. Had they gone to church with my sister and me, I probably wouldn't be an atheist today. Not that I don't like what I am, mind you.
    SarahLeeMorgan

    Answer by SarahLeeMorgan at 1:49 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • I was baptized Catholic when I was 4, then at 7 switched to a Pentecostal church when my mother remarried (my bio dad was abusive, and we ran away when I was 2). There were things about the Catholic church my stepfather didn't like, and things about his church my mother wasn't thrilled about (pulling people out of their seats to pray for them, making 5 year olds feel bad for not having offering, that kind of stuff), so when my brother and I were in a children's choir that sang at a Methodist church every so often, my mother fell in love with it, and we were raised Methodist from then on.

    My mom was more concerned about igniting a passion for God and understanding than she was about indoctrinating us or assimilating us into the church, and therefore we were encouraged to ask questions, to study, reflect, and think/believe however felt true to us. I was especially involved in church, and am still involved in my religious....
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 1:53 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • (cont) education, studying all religions, and I consider myself a Christian Universalist, as I believe in the universal salvation of all mankind, and in One God who inspired all the religions in order for His creation to find a way to Him.

    I hope to go back to school for a degree in religious studies, hopefully get more than just a master's (I'd love to take it as far as I can go), and even, one day, get ordained in some sort of UU or interfaith organization.

    =D
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 1:56 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • Gosh, Ill try and be brief LOL.

    I was raised Mormon, devout in all ways...served a mission,etc. Never doubted or anything, had a strong testimony of the gospel and Christ,etc.

    When I was 34 yrs old I left the church(it would take too long to explain why but basically I found out some things that disturbed me enough to leave).

    In finding my new path I recalled instances of my childhood that Id always put to the backburner figuring God and Jesus would answer those questions or why I was so intrigued by it all once I got to heaven. It was stuff like my intense pull to supernatural type things, to magic(not magician trickery stuff), the elements, mythology, etc. Well, in researching various things I got my answers. It may not be what others would say were answers from God but for me they were.

    So ya, childhood had a place in finding my whole self but not in a way I thought it would.
    Amaranth361

    Answer by Amaranth361 at 2:08 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • I WAS BAPTIZTED CATHOLIC AT A VERY YOUNG AGE, I GREW UP IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS UNTIL I WAS OLD ENOUGH TO REALIZE THAT THOSE THAT I THOUGHT WERE PURE OF HEART, WERE NOT. I HAD STRONG FAITH UNTIL I WAS ABOUT 12 OR SO, THEN MY EYES WERE OPEN TO THE FACT THAT PRIEST AND NUNS WERE NOT REALLY GODS REPRESENTATION HERE ON EARTH, BUT INSTEAD WERE LIKE EVERYONE ELSE SOMETIMES EVEN WORSE. THERE ARE WAY TOO MANY THINGS ABOUT THE CATHOLIC RELIGION THAT I DISLIKED, AND DIDN'T APPROVE OF. I CONTINIED MY RELATONSHIP WITH GOD ON A PERSONAL LEVEL, AND RIGHT NOW THIS IS HOW IT IS, I DO HAVE A REALLY GOOD RELATIONSHIP WITH GOD, AND I HAVE BEEN BLESSED TREMENDOUSLY THROUGHT MY LIFE.

    MY CHILDREN GREW UP IN CHRISTIANS SCHOOLS BUT WERE BAPTIZED AS CATHOLIC TO FOLLOW THE FAMILY TRADITION, DID THE FIRST COMUNION AND SO ON, I FIGURED IT COULDN'T HURT. WHEN THEY TURNED INTO THEIR TEENS, MY ELDEST TURNED AWAY FROM CHRISTIANITY CONT....
    older

    Answer by older at 2:15 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • AFTER REALIZING THAT THE FAITH SHE LOVED SO MUCH HAD TURNED AGAINST WHO SHE WAS, MY MIDDLE CHILD DIDN'T GO ONE DIRECTION OR THE OTHER BUT PRACTICES NO PARTICULAR RELIGION, AND MY THIRD CHILD MY YOUNGEST SON, BAPTIZED HIMSELF A BAPTIST CHRISTIAN AT THE AGE OF 16, AND HAS ALWAYS BEEN A BELEIVER, CHOOSING NOW NOT TO GO TO CHURCH BUT BELEIVES IN THE PRINCIPLES OF CHRISTIANITY. ALL AND ALL I HAVE BEEN BLESSED REGARDLESS OF THE RELIGIOUS AFFILIATIONS OR LACK THEREOF, MY LIFE HAS BEEN BLESSED SINCE THE DAY I WAS BORN AND IT CONTINUES TO BE THAT WAY, NEVER MISSING A CHANCE TO THANK GOD.
    older

    Answer by older at 2:20 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • My mom took us to church on and off growing up, but it was actually my Grandmother that instilled good morals in me I believe. When I got older I knew I had to make a choice for myself, either I was going to serve God or I wasn't, I have always believed in God and I was raised in a penecostal church. My church never embarrasses anyone by pulling them up and praying for them, nor do they make you feel bad for not having an offering , but I know of some churches that would. I found that my personal relationship with Jesus Christ is the most important, because no one is going to stand for me, I have to stand for myself. Good question, all the answers have been very informing and polite!
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:31 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • I was raised in a christian household in a "mixed" marriage (baptist and methodist) and dragged to church every Sunday, but I have never understood the concept of believing in a god. I've never been able to do so. I did a lot of pretending and keeping my mouth shut because in my area "everyone" HAS to believe in god, even if they don't got to church or whatever. At my college orientation weekend, I met the first person ever who felt the same way I did. It was funny -- because I had never been able to "come out" before, my parents refused to believe anything but that he had corrupted me, and his mother (despite his already being out long before he met me) insisted if we broke up, he'd believe in her god. I've been atheist since birth, and the only times I've ever wished otherwise are all just because I wanted so much to be like everyone else around me. It was just one more way I was different.
    roachiesmom

    Answer by roachiesmom at 2:49 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • I was raised with an odd mix of Christian fundamentalism and biblical literalism. My family did not attend church and instead I was taught about biblical matters at home. It was a odd mix of teachings. We kept the Sabbath candle lit on Friday evening. We celebrated the passover and not Christmas. I had to wear female clothing. I could not wear pants of any kind. If the buttons were on the wrong side of the garment it was rejected. I could not read anything that was false, so no fiction or TV. The radio was always on a Christian station. I was instructed to respond to questions of what religion are you with Baptist, which wasn't the whole truth. In reality my parents could not find a church that they agreed with 100%. Much of my Christian training didn't last past my eleventh birthday. My mother died less that a month after that in July of '88. And this is when I get culture shock.
    isabellalecour

    Answer by isabellalecour at 3:05 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

  • My father brings back everything that was forbidden before including the TV. He never forbid anything religious again but he always preached the bible and salvation. In 1999 he went to prison. My own spiritual search had started just after '89. I even went back to Church in 2000. I was even baptized, Easter Sunday. I was still unsatisfied with the Christian faith, so I left and decided to take control of my own life. I kept researching Christianity and asking questions. This time I wasn't taking "because God wants it that way" for an answer. I was shunned by my christian friends for asking the hard questions. I was shunned for having an interest in the occult. I found myself suddenly alone. So I returned to my own roots. My early pagan roots, when I could dream, where I could think for myself, where I can find peace. Freethinking.
    isabellalecour

    Answer by isabellalecour at 3:07 PM on Aug. 11, 2009

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