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Do you know where the expressing "86ing" comes from?

Common in restaurants, it means off the menu; no more of, ex: "86 the steak special", or to ban, ex: that drunk is 86ed.
But what's the origin? I've always wondered.

Answer Question
 
onethentwins

Asked by onethentwins at 2:47 PM on Aug. 12, 2009 in Just for Fun

Level 22 (12,486 Credits)
Answers (6)
  • This is what I found:
    Anybody who has worked the restaurant or catering biz knows that this term is generally used in foodservice environments when a specific item is no longer available. For example, "86 baked haddock", or "the mussels have been 86'ed" -- Suggested theories of the source of this usage include:

    Possibly a reference to article 86 of the New York state liquor code which defines the circumstances in which a bar patron should be refused service or "86ed".

    Another theory has it that this is rhyming slang for "nix." Interestingly, this seems to be an American coinage, unusual for rhyming slang.[1]

    vabchmommy

    Answer by vabchmommy at 2:51 PM on Aug. 12, 2009

  • Others have suggested that this usage originated from the famous Delmonico's Restaurant in New York City, as item number 86 on their menu, their house steak, often ran out during the 19th century.

    Another explanation is that Chumley's, which was a famous 1900s New York speakeasy, is located at 86 Bedford St. During Prohibition, an entrance through an interior adjoining courtyard was used, as it provided privacy and discretion for customers. As was a New York tradition, the cops were on the payroll of the bar and would give a ring to the bar that they were coming for a raid. The bartender would then give the command "86 everybody!", which meant that everyone should hightail it out the 86 Bedford entrance because the cops were coming in through the courtyard door.

    The term came into popular use among soldiers and veterans to describe missing soldiers as 86'd. Rather than describe buddies missing in action, it was slang to desc
    vabchmommy

    Answer by vabchmommy at 2:51 PM on Aug. 12, 2009

  • possible:

    Chumley's, a famous and OLD New York speakeasy, is located at 86 Bedford St. During Prohibition, an enterance through an interior adjoing courtyard was used, as it provided privacy and discretion for customers.

    As was (and is) a New York tradition, the cops were on the payroll of the bar and would give a ring to the bar that they were coming for a raid. The bartender would then give the command "86 everybody!", which meant that everyone should hightail it out the 86 Bedford enterance because the cops were coming in through the courtyard door.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:52 PM on Aug. 12, 2009

  • that was from urban dictionary
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:52 PM on Aug. 12, 2009

  • http://www.inspirationline.com/Brainteaser/86.htm more possibilities
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:55 PM on Aug. 12, 2009

  • The empire state building 86th floor was a place for jumping suicide....
    JESSEMOM

    Answer by JESSEMOM at 2:26 AM on Aug. 13, 2009

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