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What do i have to do to get my sons legal father to sign his rights over?

my sons father and i are going to court for child support and i dont want anything to do with him at all...so i was gonna talk to my lawyer about getting him to sign his rights over. my soon to be mother in law said that i would have to be established...like i have to be married and my own house and so on...

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FirstMomAnt

Asked by FirstMomAnt at 12:14 PM on Aug. 13, 2009 in Babies (0-12 months)

Level 1 (0 Credits)
Answers (5)
  • NO, you don't have to be established, it is up to him if he wants to sign them over. Talk to your lawyer she would know. You could make it real easy on him by saying you won't have to pay but you can still see her, granted you would have to hold that end of the bargain up. And chances are it will become very inconvent for him to make the effort to see her, sad I know. And if it is your soon to be MIL then you will be established soon so what is she worried about.
    DevilInPigtails

    Answer by DevilInPigtails at 12:27 PM on Aug. 13, 2009

  • It is up to the courts.

    They do whats best for the child not you
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:32 PM on Aug. 13, 2009

  • It's not up to him or you, it's up to the courts and they usually won't just let someone sign over there rights...at least in my state. For that to happen here there has to be someone else to adopt the child or it won't happen. The court's can terminate rights if there's good cause, abuse, abandonment, etc.
    a_and_j_momma

    Answer by a_and_j_momma at 1:06 PM on Aug. 13, 2009

  • Yup, it's up to the courts. I checked w/ my CS Office here in Michigan, and was told that the courts typically do not allow you to "bastardize" your children. She said my best hope of getting him to sign off was to be re-married for at least 6 mos, and the new husband would have to be willing to adopt.
    KLBrown

    Answer by KLBrown at 2:18 PM on Aug. 13, 2009

  • You need his consent, and the court's approval.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:53 PM on Aug. 13, 2009

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