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Have any moms expereienced getting blood work done on a 14 month old?

I have to take my 14 month old DS to get blood work done because the pedi feels he is under weight. How do they draw blood from a wild toddler? What was your experience with this?

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Scoobersmom

Asked by Scoobersmom at 9:24 PM on Aug. 20, 2009 in Toddlers (1-2)

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Answers (10)
  • They papoose them
    abellvalerie

    Answer by abellvalerie at 9:25 PM on Aug. 20, 2009

  • oh lord, don't papoose, please? oy... bottle? nurse? sipply cup? something exciting and new to distract. new toy, hersheys bar, cell phone. call grandma, auntie or other special person and have them talk to them. make a crazy noise everytime the nurse does anything. when she wipes arm w/ alcohol start meowing like crazy. when the needle goes in ask him to find the kitty..... anything to keep still just for a moment. my clinic has popcicles..... distract distract distract.
    hibbingmom

    Answer by hibbingmom at 9:31 PM on Aug. 20, 2009

  • I have to have my daughter's blood drawn every 6 months. She is 2 yrs now and it started when she was 6 months old. I just hold her and talk to her. I try to distract her but she's caught on to that so just holding and talking to her is better. But, she still screams and cries.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:33 PM on Aug. 20, 2009

  • Ask your pediatrician for a prescription for a cream called LMX or EMLA cream. This cream can be applied to the inner part of the arm/elbow (or anywhere they are going to draw labs from). The cream is a numbing cream that we use on all of the peds patients I deal with daily. It takes a half hour to an hour to kick in. If you put it on before you go it will work. They may have you hold your child in your lap to help keep still. Hibbingmom is so right....distract as much as possible. But trust me the cream works!
    ajw1980

    Answer by ajw1980 at 9:45 PM on Aug. 20, 2009

  • I think my son was probably 20 mos when I had to take him in for blood work. He was old enough to be afraid of drs. But, he did surprisingly well. The dr. told me that most usually do their first time b/c it's new and they don't know what to expect. But, I did bring his favorite lovey and a sippy cup just in case. He sat on his daddy's lap and did amazing
    ravensgirl83

    Answer by ravensgirl83 at 9:57 PM on Aug. 20, 2009

  • My son's gotten blood work since he was born. He's also 14mos old and there a few things you can do. The cream will only numb the top layer of the skin so it may or may not help. I used to breastfeed while they did it. Then when that no longer worked I let them hold him down, which I regret. He was more upset that they were holding him, than because of the pain. Last time we went in I read a book to him as they did it. He was so distracted he didn't even notice. Someone else, who's daughter has the same condition as my son, suggested I let them put it in their favorite stuffed animal or toy before they did it to them. This way they understand a little better.

    Oh and I used to sing his favorite song. Good luck! to you and your baby!
    Vero0724

    Answer by Vero0724 at 10:04 PM on Aug. 20, 2009

  • My daughter also has to get blood drawn every 3 months for her thyroid. I haven't heard of the cream (but believe me, I will ask about it). My daughter is strong, so it takes me putting her in my lap. I have to wrap one leg around hers, use one arm to hold her arm and one arm to hold her head. They have another phlabotomist (sp) hold the arm in position and then they draw the blood. She is a VERY hard draw (small, deep, rolling, positional veins) and she is a fighter. It used to be a bottle worked. Depending on the blood test, they might be able to do a finger prick.
    sondamom0828

    Answer by sondamom0828 at 5:07 AM on Aug. 21, 2009

  • My son had a high lead level at 12 months and for the next 6 months had to have a blood draw once a month. They had me hold him while one lady held his arm out and the other did the poking. I tried to distract him with a toy in the other direction didn't work after the 2nd time. His biggest issue wasn't the prick, but having to hold still for a while after wards. He never cried or screamed or anything and one time they had a 4 year old girl who was having a fit and they knew my son was good with his so they asked if she could watch him be such a big boy about it. I agreed and the little girl then sat down to have hers done. I would also nurse him immediately after they were done. The EMLA cream only numbs the top layer of skin so it will dull the pain, but not completely get rid of it and depending what they are drawing for it could effect the results so they may not give it.
    aeneva

    Answer by aeneva at 8:18 AM on Aug. 21, 2009

  • Mine had the lead test around 13 months. We sat in the chair with her on my lap. I held her still and helped hold her arm while the nurse helped and then took the blood. She was screaming mad! Wouldn't even look at either of us when it was done, but only cried for a few minutes. We didn't use any meds. and once it got time for the needle, she sat pretty still. She knew something was up.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 8:58 AM on Aug. 21, 2009

  • My son's had to have his blood drawn three times, once at 15 months and twice at 2 years. All they did each time was a finger prick and filled a small tube with the "bubbles" (as the lab nurse called it) that came out of his finger. He actually had less of a problem with that than with the shots; the second time at 2 years, when the finger prick was all they did, he didn't even cry at all, just looked at it and laughed. So it might not be that bad. But just in case, maybe give your toddler some Tylenol about 30 minutes before your appointment, and hold him instead of putting him on the table. And definitely ask his pedi about any pain management if you're super worried, they may have something they use at the office or a recommendation that tends to work for other kids. The nurses there will more than likely know best what works and what doesn't. Good luck! :-)
    DragonRiderMD

    Answer by DragonRiderMD at 10:45 AM on Aug. 21, 2009

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