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Against the law or not? Is the issue partisan?

In a strong pushback against claims made by former Vice President Dick Cheney, Sen. John McCain insisted on Sunday that the use of torture on terrorism suspects violated international law, didn't work, and actually helped al Qaeda recruit additional members.

"I think the interrogations were in violation of the Geneva Conventions and the convention against torture that we ratified under President Reagan," said the Arizona Republican. "I think these interrogations, once publicized, helped al Qaeda recruit. I got that from an al Qaeda operative in a prison camp in Iraq... I think that the ability of us to work with our allies was harmed. And I believe that information, according go the FBI and others, could have been gained through other members."

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sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 9:46 PM on Aug. 30, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (33)
  • The senator, appearing on CBS' Face the Nation, offered his assessment just hours after Cheney defended the use of torture during an interview with Fox News Sunday. Host Bob Schieffer pushed McCain to explain how it was that an al Qaeda member had told him that the use of torture helped them recruit.

    Relaying a conversation that he and Sen. Lindsey Graham, (R-S.C.) had with a jailed "high-ranking member of al Qaeda," McCain replied that pictures of detainee abuse at Abu Ghraib had allowed the terrorist organization "to recruit thousands of young men."

    And yet, despite acknowledging that the use of torture was counter-productive and in violation of international law -- laws that have been ratified by the United States -- McCain still insisted that the Obama Justice Department was wrong to launch an investigation into the matter.
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 9:46 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD1x_aafc7Y&feature=player_embedded

    He is of the it was illegal and didn't work but we should not prosecute tune, same as Obama..

    If it was illegal and ineffective and helped recruit for Al Qeda, why shouldn't someone be held accountable?
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 9:48 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • It's kinda like rape victims, after 8 years you can NOT prosecute a rapist for the incident. It is just one of those things. There is a term for it but my brain has frozen.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:54 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • It's kinda like rape victims, after 8 years you can NOT prosecute a rapist for the incident. It is just one of those things. There is a term for it but my brain has frozen.


    There isn't a statute of limitations on torture (is that what you were thinking of?)

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 9:58 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • Ah ha statute of limitations! Gah my brain was hurting from that one.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:58 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • I meant is it like a question yeah . sorry!
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:59 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • Ah ha statute of limitations! Gah my brain was hurting from that one.


    LOL..I HATE when that happens, I'll sit up in bed HOURS later with teh word I was thinking of! lol

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 9:59 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • May 20, 1988, when sending the Convention Against Torture to the U.S. Senate to be ratified, Reagan said:

    "The United States participated actively and effectively in the negotiation of the Convention. It marks a significant step in the development during this century of international measures against torture and other inhuman treatment or punishment. Ratification of the Convention by the United States will clearly express United States opposition to torture, an abhorrent practice unfortunately still prevalent in the world today.

    "The core provisions of the Convention establish a regime for international cooperation in the criminal prosecution of torturers relying on so-called 'universal jurisdiction.' Each State Party is required required either to prosecute torturers who are found in its territory or to extradite them to other countries for prosecution."

    Here's what the Convention actually said:

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 10:00 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2172287/posts
    Here it is! It is 10 years. you can't prosecute after 10 years.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:01 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

  • I still don't get why we are pressing this issue but NOT going after Rendition, too??? Clinton, Bush, and Obama all condone Rendition and if we are going to investigate Bush on interrogation tactics, then maybe we need to open the whole can of worms and investigate Clinton on Rendition as well, don't ya think? That Seems slightly partisan to me, yes!

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 10:01 PM on Aug. 30, 2009

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